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What You’ll Learn

  • An introduction to the webinar including why it is important to Spark Curiosity especially now that we are forced to engage in learning from a distance.

Make Math Moments Academy Forums 1-1 – Introduction to Sparking Curiosity From A Distance – Discussion

  • Maria Carmela Sanchez

    Member
    June 19, 2020 at 7:27 am

    My biggest take-away is to use visuals for students and for representations more often.

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      June 25, 2020 at 7:31 am

      Yes indeed! Help promote their use and ask purposeful questions to assist in emerging more strategies for us to build on during consolidation!

  • George Garza

    Member
    June 23, 2020 at 8:02 pm

    I’m glad you guys took time to try and tackle this question. I can see why you would partner with braining camp.

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      June 24, 2020 at 6:53 am

      Glad you feel that way! Yes, Brainingcamp is pretty awesome.

      If you head to the Toolkit area, we have some discount codes including one for Brainingcamp… so check it out if you’re interested!

  • Adrianne Burns

    Member
    July 6, 2020 at 8:52 am

    I love the visual of how we learn. You have used it before and it is such a great representation of what we see in our classroom. Going into a new school year after the virtual learning, which was really pandemic teaching and not necessarily quality or covering all standards, the visual has me thinking about where students will be. For many I am sure the disruption in learning shifted the path they are on. Teachers are expecting this. We know how to adjust our teaching and work with students on different paths. We are able to anticipate misconceptions and know what to ask and what to look for to understand student thinking and plan next moves. As I look at the visual I wonder about new paths that virtual learning has created. What won’t we be anticipating? What uncharted paths will we be navigating with students next year?

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      July 7, 2020 at 7:24 am

      So happy that the visual resonated.

      You’re so right as we head into the fall in a situation that none of us have ever been in. This is all the more reason why we need to shift our teaching practice from a procedures first approach to a problem solving and concepts first approach.

      If we don’t, we are sure to be spinning our wheels even more than we have in the past!

  • Tracy McDiarmid

    Member
    July 9, 2020 at 5:21 pm

    Thinking about the various places students come to us, I know that my students that are coming from other countries will have wildly different school experiences and that will affect how they will absorb the learning I offer. Making those experiences visible and more in line with the experiences they see in the world seems like it will make a difference for them

  • Colin Hamilton

    Member
    July 14, 2020 at 3:45 pm

    Hi! I love this. I appreciate that you guys are taking a step back and starting with the basics. My big take-away is the availability of brainingcamp. First I had heard of it.

    More of a curiosity that I believe will be discussed later, What does it look like to create an online/remote lesson that has a low floor?

    And what would be a good way to approach assessing your students mathematical abilities from a distance? Excited to keep learning.

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      July 15, 2020 at 7:52 am

      Glad you’re getting some early take aways… and yes; we will be diving into how to use low floor and high ceiling tasks shortly 🙂

  • Regina Dill

    Member
    July 15, 2020 at 8:39 am

    We are all in the same boat…each of us will design something that works for us and for our students but it is very helpful to learn all we can about different strategies so that we have a variety of tools to choose from. My county has students going into the classroom 1 day a week and learning remotely but as synchronously as possible the other 4 days…me teaching and it being streamed for the kids at home…a new adventure!

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      July 16, 2020 at 6:38 am

      I’d be curious to know the thought behind the 1 day a week model. Is this a rotation so 1/5 of students will attend each day?

  • Amy Keller

    Member
    July 16, 2020 at 2:46 pm

    New take-away… Math Before Bed. You are correct. Parents are encouraged to read to their children before bed, why not do math?! Wish I had this idea when my kiddos were young. 👏🏼

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      July 17, 2020 at 2:23 pm

      Loving that YOU’RE loving it!

  • Iris Windom

    Member
    July 16, 2020 at 6:13 pm

    I am certainly that kid on the slide! I am starting the new year distance learning and I am anxious. I teach 6th grade in a self-contained elementary classroom. I believe that many of our middle-grade learners still struggle with the foundational skills that are taught in the earlier grades. I will be taking a peek at both your sites. I think there might be some fortuitous finds there to help me reach them.

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      July 17, 2020 at 2:25 pm

      Well we are confident that this course will help along that journey!

      I agree regarding the fundamentals and students not being as flexible and fluent as we would like. Be sure to check out our problem based units in the task area of this site as we focus on building conceptual understanding as well as fluency and flexibility with numbers & operations!

  • Teena Daniels

    Member
    July 17, 2020 at 1:13 pm

    My take away is that we can spark students interest from a distance.

  • Susan Creenan

    Member
    July 19, 2020 at 3:36 pm

    I am a little nervous but also excited about starting school. Learning the tools and help that you are providing us is making this easier, but now I just have to take a deep breath and dive in. Not knowing what skills the students coming up to 8th grade have, I really like the idea of the activities based learning to start the class will help build their confidence (and mine).

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      July 21, 2020 at 7:03 am

      So glad to hear it. I think we are all a bit anxious about possibly entering into another school year via distance learning, but with some of these tools in our tool belt, we can do our best to Make Math Moments From A Distance each day!

  • Brenda Robinson

    Member
    July 21, 2020 at 5:59 pm

    I’m very eager to learn how to do problem based lessons remotely. Can’t wait!

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      July 22, 2020 at 8:10 am

      We are rooting for you!

  • Lisa Theriot

    Member
    July 26, 2020 at 5:37 pm

    I am excited to find a way to motivate my very unmotivated students. We used to have a program that was more problem-based, but unfortunately, the teachers found it intimidating to be in the role of facilitator. They also had to have deeper content knowledge. I’m ready to do this on my own if necessary!

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      July 30, 2020 at 7:30 am

      It can certainly be scary especially without support. Hopefully this course will help you get started and stick with it. Let us know how things are going as the school year gets under way!

  • Daniel Laguerre

    Member
    July 26, 2020 at 8:15 pm

    How to deliver problem based lesson during the covid 19 era? the new year is in less than a month, and I never felt so unprepared to face my students.

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      July 30, 2020 at 7:31 am

      Keep us posted on whether we were able to help you with this challenge as you dive deeper into this course. I think it should give you some more ideas and confidence to move forward!

  • Christina Marin

    Member
    July 31, 2020 at 5:27 pm

    I have never hear of Braining Camp, so I am excited to see what that has to offer.

    I am still wondering how do I start a school year and establish my classroom norms and procedures AND spark curiosity for big math tasks in students from a distance/computer.

  • Joyce Dunning

    Member
    July 31, 2020 at 6:40 pm

    Math Before Bed is new to me. I am thinking how I might use this to encourage parents to be more involved with their students education. I wish I had something like this when my own children were in school.

  • Miriam Rempel

    Member
    August 2, 2020 at 5:46 pm

    I wonder about how to come up with the ideas to create the curiosity in students. Last Spring, I completed all the Zearn lessons (minus listening to the lessons) from 3rd to 5th grade. I noticed that what my students struggled with in fractional understanding in the fifth grade was really 2nd, 3rd and 4th grade standards. Some students do not understand what fractions are. I was thinking that maybe I would start with numbers and operations in Fractions this year beginning with what is a fraction and students being able to draw mathematical drawings of fractions. So what could be the “spark” to encourage curiosity in students? I am imagining putting up a number line labeled with whole numbers. Ask: Are there any other numbers?

    What do you think? Maybe you have a better idea. Let me know. Miriam

    • Adrianne Burns

      Member
      August 2, 2020 at 7:08 pm

      There are some great fraction activities in Desmos. The activities allow students to play around with the visuals and there are some that connect a part/whole model to the number line. If you go to teacher.desmos.com and search Fraction you will find them.

    • Joyce Dunning

      Member
      August 2, 2020 at 7:59 pm

      Marilyn Burns at Math Solutions has a great lesson on fractions called The Lobster Problem. It is a great way to get students to work with fractions.

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      August 3, 2020 at 7:08 am

      Fractions are one of those concepts that both students and teachers aren’t huge fans of. Often times, they are taught in a “unit” at a particular time in the year instead of used throughout the year, where appropriate.

      I might consider starting with area (vs linear models) to start the year off.

      A great start might be the new Scavenger Hunt Unit that we posted in the tasks area of the Academy. Have you checked it out yet?

      Scavenger Hunt

  • Maureen Bia

    Member
    August 4, 2020 at 7:52 pm

    I think I am missing some of the module…

  • Brent Sturtevant

    Member
    September 14, 2020 at 12:16 pm

    I just want to figure a plan of how to teach in the hybrid model in a creative manner. There is so much change and such a new process that I believe that I will struggle (which is expected). I am hoping that these modules will help plan and figure the best way to approach teaching math lessons.

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      September 15, 2020 at 6:20 am

      I think it will give you a good sense of what you might expect and how you might plan and anticipate moving forward. Do keep us updated!

  • Wendy Joevenazzo

    Member
    October 27, 2020 at 8:31 pm

    I’m teaching in a virtual school this year. I’ve always thought math has to be visual so the first thing I did was buy a document camera so I can “show” the math. Now I’m looking for ways to make teaching and learning online engaging and real and I’m looking for good online assessment too. We work with some interesting parameters (eg. there must be a “video” of every lesson taught) (each subject only has two synchronous lessons per week) so I’m always looking for ways to teach that will fit our different parameters.

    • Jon

      Administrator
      October 30, 2020 at 6:16 am

      Hi there @wendy-Joevenazzo , It sounds like you’ve got a great plan for your situation. What resources have you found to be most useful so far?

  • Weston Miller

    Member
    November 15, 2020 at 7:18 pm

    I like the segment talking about the different learning paths and rates of progression each student takes. I feel like this is a much easier concept to keep track of in a “physical” classroom than a virtual one. Keeping track of student progress and finding the best individual avenues to success is really hard when we’re not in the same room as our students

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      November 16, 2020 at 6:30 am

      This is so true. Being at a distance certainly introduces many barriers to keeping up with formative assessment. If you can find time for breakout rooms for small group instruction, that can be helpful for closing that face to face / distance assessment gap.

  • Sabin Thompson

    Member
    December 1, 2020 at 4:13 pm

    I love the video clips. No questions right now, thank you.