Forum Replies Created

  • Susan Ethridge

    Member
    December 14, 2020 at 8:46 am

    Over the years working with students in intervention groups, many upper elementary, and even some of my sixth graders still use tally marks to help themselves with computation. It really shows their need for more activities to count with concrete objects and notice and create patterns. An example activity might be to use dominos to pose questions to students comparing each half of the domino. Which has more? Which has less? How many more? How many less? How many altogether? How many more to make ten? How many more to make twenty?

  • Susan Ethridge

    Member
    December 13, 2020 at 10:23 pm

    I like this gave me more ideas for encouraging students to see units in different ways. It opens up their minds to different perspectives which tends to get them more excited about learning and sharing their ideas.

  • Susan Ethridge

    Member
    December 13, 2020 at 9:58 pm

    To help learn the metric system of measuring length, we had Metric Olympics Day where students predicted, estimated, and then measured different Olympic events. Example event: Long jump – how far can you jump with two feet together from a standing position? Students predicted how many centimeters they could jump, then they would jump and estimate how far they jumped, and finally they would measure how far they actually jumped. On a day prior to this activity, the students made up their own unit of measure, defined it’s length and measure things around the room to learn about the reason for a standardized way to measure.

  • Susan Ethridge

    Member
    December 13, 2020 at 9:34 pm

    I personally have always loved working with anything having to do with spatial reasoning. I love all types of puzzles. I grew up playing board games and blocks. My dad built things and I watched and “helped”. My mom and I always played “Find the differences” in the daily paper. All this to say, I think that is why one of my strengths is spatial reasoning and why I agree with others here in the importance of focusing on attributes. One thing I have been doing is using “Which one doesn’t belong” picture groups with students notice more details and different attributes and perspectives in the pictures and relate it to the world around us.

  • Susan Ethridge

    Member
    November 7, 2020 at 5:43 pm

    I really like the visual you presented here of the interconnectivity of proportionality. I have been working to reveal this to my students this year, which is why I jumped on this course. It’s helping me add ideas to bridge gaps and bring deeper conceptual understanding to my students.

  • Susan Ethridge

    Member
    November 7, 2020 at 2:19 pm

    I’m a 6th grade math teacher, trying to motivate virtual learners and draw them into discussions. They much prefer being silent observers, left wondering why they aren’t doing well in class. I like the thoughtfulness of these activities. They are less threatening since they seem to ask for an opinion instead of an answer that can be right or wrong. Middle schoolers do not like risking being wrong in front of their peers. Great way to draw them into thinking more deeply about relationships between numbers.

  • Susan Ethridge

    Member
    October 5, 2020 at 1:16 am

    I teach 6th grade math, but I have taught math as either a classroom teacher or interventionist in every grade kinder – 8th. Proportional reasoning is the ability to see multiplicative relationships in the world around us. It is important because it can be found everywhere so not understanding it makes a person miss out on understanding so very much of that world. When I was a junior high interventionist, I spent a great deal of time working with students on proportions because it is so highly tested. I had a percent wheel poster and each day for 100 days, students would take turns coloring in a slice of the percent wheel and our warm-up was all about the percent of the day…kind of like a number talk. It was an 8th grade class and one of my favorite moments as as teacher was when a student came back from Spring Break all excited to tell me she knew what the sale prices would be on the percent off sale racks when she and her mom went shopping. We spent every day for 100 days on the topic they were taught in 6th and 7th grade and still that’s what it took for the conceptual understanding to come to some of them. Another thing I will mention is that when I am a classroom teacher, as I am this year, I have to be careful not to fall to the pressure of test preparation and make sure I spend enough time on conceptual understanding.