Forum Replies Created

  • Serina Signorello

    Member
    December 31, 2021 at 4:01 pm

    I think my biggest takeaway is that creating this environment in my classroom is going to take time and that it’s okay for me to start small. Sometimes I want to dive in 100%, but then I become overwhelmed and may fall back on old habits. I think taking small steps will also get me to the place I want to be.

    I also need someone in my department who is willing and interested in going on this journey with me. Several teachers are on their way to retiring in the upcoming years and I would like to mentor some new teachers to have a partner interested in joining me on this journey.

    I also need to reevaluate the way I assess students and figure out what will work best in my classroom.

  • Serina Signorello

    Member
    December 30, 2021 at 3:35 pm

    The idea of cumulative assessments, although daunting because it is so new, definitely makes sense especially when students need to be prepared to assess on all the topics at the end of the year. I am working on the “timeliness” of returning my assessments, but feel fewer questions will definitely aid in that process. Does this mean removing all end of unit assessments or just to also include topics from earlier in the year? I feel this may make the assessment too long.

    As much as I like the ideas from this video, I feel some of them are going to take me time to wrap my head around them. For example #3, our policy in my district was that the students could reassess one assessment in a marking period. Students completing quiz corrections, me grading to see if they understand and reteaching during study halls and after school, creating new review questions, and new quiz questions and grading them takes up a large amount of time. Do conversations with the student count as reassessing?

    In Strategy 4 you discuss standards based learning, I’ve never done this before and I was overwhelmed when I tried to wrap my head around it. I believe this may take a while to figure out. Does anyone have any ideas on how to get started? When giving a test on the standards used in a previous quiz, do you enter an entire new grade with the same standard or do you adjust that mark based on the new assessment? If so, do you ever go down a mark if it seems they are totally confused still?

    I’ve started implementing smaller, more frequent assessments and cumulative assessments, however my district requires review guides in IEPs and my supervisor feels you should always let the students know what to expect on their assessments. My review day’s have just become practice and learning material days.

    This year has been particularly difficult in implementing new things since my students are relearning how to be students. Just the idea of studying for an assessment seems foreign to them and they are used to taking tests and quizzes online with the internet and photomath, they are disappointed every time I inform them their quiz is on paper.

  • Serina Signorello

    Member
    September 7, 2021 at 3:10 pm

    I struggle to have the courage to pivot especially when working to stay at pace with teachers in the same subject since we give common quarterly and final exams. There are many times when some students need additional time to gain a deeper understanding while several incorrectly placed students are already there. I struggled to find enough extensions and additional tasks for the students who grasp the concept quickly the first time. My goal this year is to focus on developing a conceptual understanding and I think the concrete and visual models will be very helpful in achieving this goal.

    Last year I was able to develop students visual understanding of multiplying binomials and factoring trinomials in the form x^2+bx+c but I struggled to find a visual model for factoring trinomials in the form ax^2+bx+c when a>1. I tried having my advanced students work on it as a challenge but we had a difficult time explaining the why between the trick to find the two terms that add up to b and multiply to ac. The visual works so well with the simple version. Any ideas, thoughts, or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

  • Serina Signorello

    Member
    July 1, 2021 at 3:06 pm

    In lessons like this, the students are engaged in the problem at the start of the lesson and excited to figure them out, whereas in traditional math lessons it can become mechanical, especially when students are not actively engaged until the practice which typically occurs at the end of the lesson. In the latter the teacher is doing most of the thinking.

    Benefits: My students enjoy notice and wonder questions because they are all capable of noticing and wondering. I believe this aids in building the confidence of low performing students. I especially enjoy how problems like the ones in the video have a low floor and many different ways of approaching the problem which make it accessible for all learners. I love how Kyle mentioned coming back to a task that was previously used. I did the post-it note and camera case lesson for slope this year and referred back to it informally last year. Now I am excited to think of questions I can use when re-introducing the problem for writing equations of lines and systems of equations.

    Reservations: The challenging part for me is feeling overwhelmed, like I need to scrap everything I used to do and dive into this 150%. I’m not sure if I need to spend a year going fully problem-based (try the illustrative mathematics curriculum), pull problems from all of the resources I’ve found through MMM Podcast, or figure out how to spiral my curriculum.

    Thankfully I used the pandemic to test out problem-based lessons and did some exploring and tried many new activities, so I have a place to start.

  • Serina Signorello

    Member
    January 4, 2022 at 8:20 am

    Thank you I will definitely check it out!