Forum Replies Created

  • Natalie VanWyngaarden

    Member
    August 17, 2021 at 12:46 pm

    Excellent speaker that took all these concepts and presented them in a simple and effective manner. The big idea I took away is how we craft our math lessons. Engaging students so that they become addicted to the math is important. We want students to willingly engage in math and think about math because they want to not just because they have to.

  • Natalie VanWyngaarden

    Member
    August 5, 2021 at 10:08 pm

    Hi, I ordered the book Building Thinking Classrooms and currently I am reading chapter 7. For a professional book it is an easy read and easy to understand. I think teachers will be pleasantly surprised with it. Some great resources are listed within the book e.g., further website includeing material that he has posted.

  • Natalie VanWyngaarden

    Member
    February 5, 2021 at 3:30 pm

    Seeing the comments above e.g., 5- (-3)=8 vs, -3-5=8. Perhaps we can think of direction on the number line when adding positive numbers you move to the right, when subtracting positive numbers you move to the left as the number is getting smaller because you are removing. When adding negative numbers you move left as the number of red squares is getting larger. When subtracting it goes the other direction to the right due to the zero principle. Less number of reds means you are moving to the right. Just a thought as a way of explaining the difference. Use this with the other explanation too.

  • Natalie VanWyngaarden

    Member
    September 9, 2020 at 7:53 pm

    Hi! My name is Natalie. I am teaching all in person but wearing a mask and shield. Last year was the first year I taught grade 7 Math. Due to the changes in numbers I will be teaching grade 6 Math, grade 6 English, grade 6 art, grade 7 English, grade 7 art and grade 7 Math. One of the classes will be a split 6/7. It will be a busy year for sure. I just found out about these subjects last week so of course I am busily gathering and planning for the upcoming year. This will be a great course to gain insight into Math. Enjoy!

  • Natalie VanWyngaarden

    Member
    August 27, 2020 at 6:28 pm

    Models are so key to help students understand. Students even at the intermediate grades may not know them so introducing them is key e.g., area model etc.

  • Natalie VanWyngaarden

    Member
    August 27, 2020 at 5:52 pm

    As it so happens financial literacy is a new curriculum. The example on the investment is the type of thinking that the students are expected to do so your examples was such a fitting one to my grade level e.g., grade 7 math.

  • Natalie VanWyngaarden

    Member
    August 27, 2020 at 5:23 pm

    It is important as it serves as a foundational piece in math to help students understand percentage etc. due to its multiplicative nature. As it is essential I am wondering why textbook that cost so much to develop and involve educators are not addressing this.

  • Natalie VanWyngaarden

    Member
    August 5, 2020 at 10:19 am

    I took this course because I knew that I had gaps with technology. I had a lot and I mean a huge amount of anxiety around technology due to bad experiences a.k.a. cyber-bullying. You have shown me the positive usage of technology. Being a visual learner means that your lessons have reinforced major concepts and ideas in math. As I went through each and every module I realized that you guys have read a lot of books and articles on everything to do with math from Jo’s website, Marilyn’s books, Ministry of Education guiding principles etc. and so I was blown away with your knowledge and all the reading and synthesizing you have done. You have added to my math toolbox. I want to use your resources and implement some of your sparking curiosity and wonder tasks. Thank-you.

  • Natalie VanWyngaarden

    Member
    August 3, 2020 at 5:28 pm

    Apparently researchers are using geometry to help them develop vaccine by looking at the 3-D shapes of viruses. Math has many applications to science and scientific discoveries.

  • Natalie VanWyngaarden

    Member
    July 6, 2020 at 2:29 pm

    What great comments above. I was a visual learner like Mark and as I have always had short term memory issues my ability to visualize and use patterns helped greatly in math as a student. In my intermediate math classes students were only using traditional algorithm in division and multiplication. Only 1 student used halving and doubling and actually knew what it was. Counting stages were not mentioned at all and neither was mental math strategies in our teaching training. A lot of this information has really only been around for a relatively short time. This means that unless teachers are reading about the latest theories and development in teaching then they will not be teaching the students this information either. Adult trainers need to be masters trainers. Lack of time to teach, constant changes, increasing behaviour issues in classes and ever increasing rotary schedules at the younger grades add to this problem. Don’t forget only 3% of English graduates were hired at one point upon graduation at the elementary panel. Only recently has this changed. This all impacts math instruction for sure.

  • Natalie VanWyngaarden

    Member
    July 6, 2020 at 1:21 pm

    What a great tool for planning a lesson. A backward design approach could be used here too. Start with thinking what you hope they would achieve at mastery level and then move back. This could be used for assessment too or even to group students into guided groups depending on where they are on the trajectory and how they struggle or move through these stages.

  • Natalie VanWyngaarden

    Member
    June 30, 2020 at 11:57 pm

    Welcome to the community. The resources here are great. I too teach middle school math. I have more recently learned about Jo Boaler’s resources on data management which she recently published.

  • Natalie VanWyngaarden

    Member
    June 4, 2020 at 5:13 pm

    Assessments keep changing and not always for the best. Although standardized testing is one way to monitor students understanding and knowledge of curriculum, it has also created stress for students and worry for the parents. I remember when we had no marks on the report cards in the elementary years. Less stressful for the students as the focus was not on marks but instead meeting the expectations. Some students sadly are getting brides or comments like if you get all A’s then we will get you a puppy …..

  • Natalie VanWyngaarden

    Member
    June 3, 2020 at 12:23 pm

    Like yourself I too wanted to focus on math PD. Science involves experiments or hands-on learning and connections to real life issues so students would enjoy it.

  • Natalie VanWyngaarden

    Member
    June 2, 2020 at 12:04 pm

    I too teach Grade 7. Having moved from the early years to now the intermediate my goal is like yours to have engaging lessons to reach all students. I wanted to be aware of all the technological options available too knowing that the long distance learning may continue in the fall and on…

  • Natalie VanWyngaarden

    Member
    May 31, 2020 at 1:21 pm

    I have students whom have strong math facts and can jump to the 84000 divided by 4200 but have issues with showing models in part because they haven’t had a lot of exposure.

  • Natalie VanWyngaarden

    Member
    May 31, 2020 at 12:38 pm

    I like the live mode option as a way to monitor pariticipation. Is this always accessible as in it doesn’t matter if you are live, or in mission, in a game option but this allows you to see when and how often they are going into the KH platform to complete the activities?

  • Natalie VanWyngaarden

    Member
    May 31, 2020 at 12:17 pm

    A very powerful tool. I like how you can measure the growth in the live-game show that you showed. Are the features similar for the mission end e.g., you can see what they got correct and build a portfolio from there?

  • Natalie VanWyngaarden

    Member
    May 31, 2020 at 12:04 pm

    As a teacher you have to have a lot of knowledge of the different stages of thinking to know where they are at and their struggles. Do you know of a good resource that shows this chart of thinking and the development stages one that breaks it down. In language for example at the elementary grades they will say if you are at level a your text will have this and you can do this… all the way to z. Does such a thing exist for math thinking?

  • Natalie VanWyngaarden

    Member
    May 31, 2020 at 11:49 am

    Good way to see what the common errors are so you can address. The bar at the top gets you to see whom is participating which is great. What do you do if for those students whom don’t participate? What incentive do you use to encourage this participation?

  • Natalie VanWyngaarden

    Member
    May 31, 2020 at 11:34 am

    Registration question. If you have already entered in student’s name to your class do you need an open registration? If this is a live and you don’t know who will participate then you would need to set up as open. However if this was done in a classroom would you need to have open registration if you have already set up the names? Is this option only appearing because it is a live game show? Be careful about assumptions because Eli was the first name and so student’s whom are not familiar may have clicked this? What grade level is this as you made reference to the additive and multiplicative thinking.

  • Natalie VanWyngaarden

    Member
    May 19, 2020 at 8:23 pm

    Making connections among the math topics and the importance of math language.

  • Natalie VanWyngaarden

    Member
    May 19, 2020 at 8:00 pm

    My big take away was the importance of exposing the kids to mathematical language starting at a young age e.g., names of fractions and even math words like partition. Also we need to be selective about the models we use. The circle model has its issues with odd numbers/ large numbers whereas the area model less so. We need to move from concrete to visual to abstract .

  • Natalie VanWyngaarden

    Member
    May 19, 2020 at 7:46 pm

    The big idea of the video was the interconnection among place value, decimals and fractions and how the magnitude changes e.g., multiplying by 10 or grouping into 10 as you move from ones to tens to hundreds. This reverses in the other direction e.g. dividing by ten and hence decimal notation. I always find the history of words fascinating. Latin and Greek was never offered in high school when I was a kid and I wished it was. Many of our math words have as mentioned a logic to its name so knowing this really helps us to make the connections. I learnt about the eleven name which was interesting. Our language always continues to evolve…

  • Natalie VanWyngaarden

    Member
    May 19, 2020 at 7:28 pm

    Connections between using a number line and place value. The analogy between billion and trillion really reinforced the concept of place value and the base ten values. Visuals and models are difficult for students to handle unless they have had prior exposure. Never make assumptions with kids. I have found that even students at the intermediate level have difficulties reading visuals and knowing the parts or components. I really had to reinforce how to read visuals and looking at titles, captions, arrows etc. Some students have spatial visual orientation challenges. I had students with L.D. in math so the spatial orientation was a challenge (e.g., writing numbers vertically versus horizontally).

  • Natalie VanWyngaarden

    Member
    May 17, 2020 at 11:52 pm

    I have taken lots of P.D. in math with primary and junior math in the past. I have familiarized myself with some of the ideas from Making Math Meaningful and Jo Boaler’s Mindset books. My goal is to learn about rich math tasks that engage teenagers. In the younger grades lots of concrete hands-on activities were key. Intermediate students still need this and they are very much visual learners too. Lots of gaps in math. With the primary grades the biggest gaps were always in reading and less so in math. The trend changes as the students advance in the grades so that the gaps in math are wider. Many students lack basic math facts which is problematic. Students need to be prepared for high school so trying to address expectations from the younger grades is challenging. At a recent math conference I wondered about one of the presenters ideas about the spiral curriculum. Each unit was alternated weekly e.g., 1 week number sense then the subsequent week was a weeks worth of geometry etc. I liked how you addressed many areas of math in one of your videos. In the shot put video you used measurement, number sense and data management.

  • Natalie VanWyngaarden

    Member
    May 17, 2020 at 11:15 pm

    My name is Natalie. I have taught a wide variety of grades and subjects (e.g., grades 2,3,4, 7,8). Currently I am now teaching grade 7 math. This is a new assignment for me but I am excited about it.

  • Natalie VanWyngaarden

    Member
    August 16, 2021 at 1:43 pm

    Yes , I do see how this book aligns with Math Making Moments ideology. I laughed about the behaviour issues he mentions in the traditional method e.g., slackers, procrastinators etc. and how standing at the vertical board alleviates this. I was surprised about the homework ideas as in not assigning it. I liked the idea of using understanding of concepts question. His organization method for tracking work and how he listed it in a table format helps me to see how you could possibly track this.. He did caution too that a thinking classroom will not be easy for students. He included ideas for extensions for those groups that finish early too and listed in a step-by-step example to help teachers address this issue. The examples of activities at the end of each chapter are a great resource that I will use. Did you participate in the research? People need repetition and lots of it to master or understand a concept ( at least I do) so highlighting and reading his book helps me to understand the objective of the thinking classroom and how and why it is set-up in the manner that it is.