Forum Replies Created

  • Kayla Robillard

    Member
    August 4, 2020 at 2:35 pm

    My biggest takeaway…..how do I pick just one! Like changing textbook questions to spark curiosity or the 3-part framework or the different effective assessment strategies. There are so many starting points for different areas of the math classroom that I am going to modify or try to implement some of these strategies in the coming years. One thing that is sticking out for my current situation is the different ways/levels of spiralling a math course. Last year I was in a new grade and had a colleague (who was teaching a similar grade and had previously spiralled her year) share her spiral with me. That was a huge help and made it easier in my first attempt to spiral the math curriculum. Seeing as I don’t know what my teaching assessment is going to be in September, I found this section to ease some of my worries about not getting enough time to learn the curriculum and plan for that grade. Being able to spiral at a smaller level may be what I have to do for this coming year, just based on the current situation. This way I will still feel that the students are practicing those retrieval skills and making connections between the different concepts. I am also excited to use some of the planning templates in the real time when I get to start planning for the current school year.

    I have always been a math girl and knew that I had a passion for it. Since I have started teaching I have taken both the Math Part 1 and Part 2 Additional Qualification courses (here in Ontario) to help build a deeper understanding of how to teach math. In complete honesty, I have learned more this online course than I have in both those 2 courses combined. So thanks to both of you, Jon and Kyle, for taking the time to put together this amazing course and sharing your knowledge with all of us! I am sure that it will be something that I refer to frequently in the coming years.

  • Kayla Robillard

    Member
    July 23, 2020 at 9:41 am

    I found the lesson to be very interesting. I have been questioned by some of the teachers and parents that I have worked with on this back-to-basics approach verses discovery approach, which is sometimes hard to explain to someone. I like the explanation used here. Going back to the beginning of concepts, I think is huge in order to see exactly what and where the students are at. I found myself doing this this year multiple times in order to make sure the students had a full understanding. I also think that part of the struggle is that not all teachers think in this discovery way, so when you get students who have been in a “back-to-basics” classroom for a couple of years, it takes a while to have be comfortable in the more discovery type of classroom. It takes them a while to feel like they are capable in math class and know that they can do the work it was just never delivered to them this way before. I think that knowing and having a recollection of multiplication facts does help in the older grades, I don’t think that they have to be “memorized”. Students can have an understanding of multiplication that will enable them to solve any type of multiplication; including the basics facts.

  • Kayla Robillard

    Member
    July 21, 2020 at 7:26 pm

    I found that not being with the students right now made this is harder than I thought. Here is my go at subtracting multi-digit numbers. I can see how this would be very beneficial when teaching a topic, when its a new topic or something you have been teaching for a while.