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  • Jon Orr

    Administrator
    May 1, 2019 at 12:03 pm

    Pick a lesson you are planning to teach this week.

    Then, reflect on how you can ensure that YOU are incorporating the elements of the AGES Learning Model in that lesson to help your gain attention, promote students generating new connections from the new learning to their prior knowledge, somehow ensuring that positive emotion is included to help make it a true math moment that matters and finally, how can you space the learning and practice to help ensure the learning sticks?

    Then, share out your reflection here in the message board and comment on at least one (1) other participant’s reflection.

  • Jackilyn Wolford

    Member
    May 13, 2020 at 2:27 pm

    <div>I will be using the following problem called Bubble Madness from CPM.</div>

    I think this problem will get student’s attention because they get to play with bubbles (that is fun for even 7th graders). Although the problem is laid out in a pretty structured way, I think working with a team, and this hands-on approach to discovering pi, not just being lectured on it, will lead to a memorable lesson.

    The idea of the circumference of a circle is similar to the idea of the perimeter for other shapes; it is the distance around the circle. Wrapping a string around a circular object is one way to measure its circumference. In this activity, you will investigate the relationship of the circumference of a circle to its diameter. The diameter is the length from one side of the circle to the other, through its center.

    1. Follow the directions below.

      • Obtain a bubble wand, some bubble solution, and construction paper from your teacher.

      • Blow a bubble and allow it to land and pop on your construction paper. You will see a circle on your paper. (If this does not produce a clear circle, try catching the bubble you blow with your bubble wand and then placing it on the construction paper.)

      • Wrap a string carefully around this circle and then stretch it along a meter stick to measure the circumference of the circle. Make your measurement accurate to the nearest tenth of a centimeter.

      • Then use a string and ruler to find the longest measurement across the circle (also accurate to the nearest tenth of a centimeter). This is the diameter.

      Share tasks so that each person has a chance to blow some bubbles and to measure their circumference and diameter. Take data for at least 8 circles of different sizes.

    2. Organize your data in a table and then work with your team to decide on an appropriate scale to graph the data carefully on graph paper.

    3. Discuss the following questions with your team and be prepared to explain your ideas to the class.

      1. How can you use your graph to show that the circumference and diameter are related proportionally? (Remember that these are measurements and will thus have some degree of error.)

      2. Approximately what is the multiplier between the diameter and the circumference?

    • Holly Dybvig

      Member
      July 25, 2021 at 10:28 pm

      I love this idea! How fun! Everyone loves bubbles! You could even capture their attention sooner by getting the gigantic bubble maker and demonstrating outside or in a video. I think I might take this page from you when I teach my advanced math class this year! Thank you for your wonderful idea!

    • Betsy Murphy

      Member
      August 2, 2021 at 9:58 pm

      I really like this circle activity, I will definitely use it to kick off my circle unit, thanks for sharing and I feel it will definitely generate interest!

  • Nancy Van Hall

    Member
    June 5, 2020 at 2:55 am

    Distance learning has made it tough to follow the AGES learning model. I have used a mix of wodb, splat, and cube connections for warm ups to get their attention. Each lesson I pick a problem to withhold information and have students share in the chat. I have found that I don’t get through nearly as many samples in distance learning as I would in class. For the turn and talks I have students pair up and private message each other then share their thinking. I’m a huge growth mindset fan and have all year trained my students to positively state their questions and difficulties, so that by the end of the year they correct each other, and me!

  • Premila Goorye

    Member
    June 8, 2020 at 10:56 am

    With distance learning it is hard to incorporate the AGES model especially with the grade 2’s. But when I am back in September I need to work more on time management in order to make learning enjoyable rather than rush through the lesson and move to the next topic. Allowing more time for social interaction during the notice and wonder or the think/pair/share. With my long range plans I will try to space and break the lessons into smaller chunks where it makes more sense to the students. I have been using lots of games at the start of this year and students really enjoyed!

  • Ericka Legnard

    Member
    June 15, 2020 at 11:50 am

    A lesson I’ll teach near the beginning of next year is about proportional linear relationships.

    To gain attention, I’ll make sure that the problem is an interesting one, like a notice and wonder – maybe using Dan Meyer’s “Nana’s Chocolate Milk” task

    For generation, I’ll ask students to create their own strategies for figuring out how to fix Nana’s milk, and share these out to highlight multiple representations.

    For emotion, making sure I’m valuing all of the different responses and fostering a positive, welcoming environment that allows students to feel heard. (Also, something about solving problems for Nana seems to make the room warm and fuzzy.)

    Spacing is the one I struggle with the most. Bringing this idea of proportional relationships up throughout the year, when studying linear relationships that are not proportional, would help solidify this concept.

    • Vanessa Weske

      Member
      August 12, 2021 at 6:53 pm

      Ericka,

      This sounds like a fun and thorough lesson that fits the AGES learning model. Thank you for bringing up Dan Meyer’s resources! I will check those out.

  • Teena Daniels

    Member
    June 16, 2020 at 12:03 pm

    I have been looking deeply at my current grade level standards and have created a document that shows how the different concepts connect or link with each other. I have worked with the two other teachers at my grade level. We are now thinking about how we can create engaging lessons to ensure students receive the lessons from missed lesson of the previous school year and still learn everything they need to learn for this upcoming current school year.

    • Michelle Grebe

      Member
      April 12, 2021 at 2:20 pm

      Look out Jon and Kyle! 😀 Another wonderful math duo on it’s way!

      • azuka ojini

        Member
        July 9, 2021 at 11:06 pm

        Yes I agree,, they’ve GENERATED a monster of math gurus. I suppose that was their intention all along.

  • Sheila Akinleye

    Member
    June 25, 2020 at 6:45 pm

    One of the lessons we usually teach at the beginning of the school year is rational vs irrational numbers, comparing irrational numbers, and understanding that every number has a decimal expansion. I’m still thinking through and searching for lessons that can help me approach the learning goals for these skills from a problem-based approach. However, my plan will be to find a task that starts a few learning goals before the target goals that really grabs the Attention of students. Nothing gimmicky, but something definitely geared toward sparking curiosity by following the curiosity path. To provide for the Generation of student ideas and ownership, we will Notice and Wonder and make predictions that will allow us to reflect on what we’re observing and create new learning. I will create positive Emotions out of this experience for my students by giving them clear feedback and helping them know they can and will learn what they need to know. Finally, the Social Interaction students will enjoy will come from the the turn and talk, math fights, and conversations around sharing their math thinking. I know that this is not very precise but as I refine learning goals and search for appropriate tasks, this is how I plan to keep AGES in mind.

  • Kyle Ferreira van Leer

    Member
    June 26, 2020 at 12:05 pm

    Given that we are in break, I’m thinking towards the start of the year when I reflect on a lesson. I’m considering how I want to start building conceptual understanding of isometries in the plane (reflections, rotations, and reflections) and how congruency is related to them.

    Attention: I plan on getting students attention by having them look at various visualizations of these isometries in the real world. I will have them notice and wonder about the things happening. I also plan on having them follow some “dance” moves with me to experience the various isometries, without naming any of them.

    Generalization: I want to provide students with two images that seem to be congruent, by looking at them, and notice and wonder about them. Then they will have to prove, using the various methods we have begun to experience and name (probably at this point with more student generated language — like turn, flip, and move) how to get from one to the other. This will require students to think about the ways that things move to get from one place to another, to prove congruency. There will be multiple ways of doing it as well, but they have to figure that out. Students will be working in groups to determine the series of steps it takes to get from one spot to the other, using a set of rigid transformations.

    Emotion: By having students work with an open ended problem, they are given choice in the way that they solve. Activation through the use of visuals and dancing is also a way to build emotions in the math space — I don’t like them having to stay in their seats for long periods of time. I will provide feedback as I walk around to groups at their vertical white boards who are trying to prove the two shapes are the same, as they figure out a “dance” that gets them from one to the other. And this builds fairness in that they are constructing their own conceptual knowledge of transformational geometry without me having front-loaded any information.

    Spacing: This work will be just the beginning of the transformational geometry concept. We will return to this concept later in the year when we look at slope and slope triangles, and when we examine angles from transversals. I want to try and connect it to as many different topics as possible. When we talk about the y-intercept, we will explore how that is a manifestation of a translation in the plane.

  • Melanie Field

    Member
    January 3, 2021 at 4:50 pm

    Attention: I will start with the Tax Man problem (http://www.peterliljedahl.com/teachers/good-problem). I will get the students’ attention by role-playing the game with a student. The student would choose a number and I as the tax collector would take the factors of the number selected. In pairs, I would get them to record their noticings and wonderings. They would then share these back to the group. During this stage, words like ‘factor’ and ‘prime number’ would be clarified.

    Generation: I would share the details of the task verbally (as suggested in Building Thinking Classrooms by Peter Liljedahl p107) and then would get the students working in random groups of three on vertical non-permanent surfaces. I would also select student work (from basic to advanced) to share with the class and get other groups to figure out and share what each group had done and discovered. After that, I would consolidate the lesson, tying in the learning goals and linking to other learning. Lastly, I would give students time to write themselves notes to their forgetful selves in their maths books or as a group on their vertical surfaces).

    Questions:

    Is it possible to beat the tax collector in this $12 game? If so, how? What is the maximum score you can get?
    Possible extensions: What if you played the game with paychecks from $1 to $24? How about $1 to $48? Can you think of your own numbers to try?

    Emotion: to engage the students’ emotions I would use SCARF:

    S = Status (provide positive descriptive feedback to the groups as I go around the groups (whether it be about maths dispositions, the way they are collaborating, or the maths)).

    C = Certainty (helping the students to see that they can and will succeed) – sharing growth mindset messages.

    A = Autonomy (giving the students choice about which extension problem they choose to develop their thinking further and by getting them to write notes to their forgetful selves).

    R = Relatedness (providing students with paper/envelopes to create the manipulatives for the task and asking questions about how the groups are recording their working (i.e. tables) will help make the context real.

    F = Fairness (random groups, one marker per group to be shared, consolidation from the bottom up, groups explaining what other groups have done).

    Spacing: The following day and the following week, I would get the students to play in pairs the Factors and Multiples game https://nrich.maths.org/factorsandmultiples to reinforce their learning about factors and multiples. The following week, I would give them a more difficult task ‘1001 Pennies’ (http://www.peterliljedahl.com/teachers/good-problem).

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      January 4, 2021 at 10:14 am

      Hi Melanie,

      I love how you’ve really taken a deep dive into the AGES model and even more deeply into the particulars for emotion (SCARF).

      Do you have plans to put this task into action anytime soon? I’d love to hear how it goes!

    • azuka ojini

      Member
      July 9, 2021 at 11:15 pm

      Wow! What a well thought out reflection. I truly enjoyed your post. I particularly found the Factors and Multiple Game invigoratingly entertaining. Thanks for sharing. Where have you been hiding?

    • Marjorie Allred

      Member
      July 27, 2021 at 6:22 pm

      I really like this plan. Thanks for introducing me to Peter Liljendahl’s Good Problems. They are going to be a great resource.

  • Jody Soehner

    Member
    March 6, 2021 at 3:48 pm

    The book Make it Stick: The Science of Successful Learning by Brown et al. addresses many of the ideas you have outlined in this lesson. I was planning on this year being the year that I would give spiralling the curriculum a go. Alas, with Covid, our school board has asked all classes to follow the same long range plans in order to help support learners as they switch from face-to-face to online learning and visa versa throughout the year so I have not tried it. One of the areas that they emphasize in learning is retrieval. <b style=”font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; color: inherit;”>During retrieval, you fetch material from your long term memory. This concurrently strengthens the memory traces and reconsolidates them by connecting them to the new learning. Retrieval practice is about recalling concepts, facts or events from memory. The key is to use testing as a tool to retrieve learning from memory, rather than a dipstick to judge your capability. With this end in mind and the idea of interleaving practice, I do not have any big tests but rather have weekly quizzes that can include any material from the year so far. The next day, I then do a bellwork activity that focuses on the concepts most poorly done in the quiz. I include more questions on the BIG concepts studied earlier in the year. What I need to implement more that you have mentioned and Brown suggests as well is the idea of reflection after new learning. I will try that this week.

  • Scott McNutt

    Member
    March 8, 2021 at 8:22 pm

    My 8th-grade group will be looking at different geometric solids in our current unit. The one I always enjoy doing with my students is finding the surface area of spheres. The lesson is not new since I remember doing the same activity when I was in middle school. But since it was a great math memory for me, I decided to pass it down to my students

    The activity goes like this.

    Take an orange and cut it in half.Use the half orange to trace as many circles of the base of the orange hemisphere on a sheet of paperPeel the orange and completely cover as many circles as possible.When you find the peel covers four circles completely, drive the formula for the surface area of the sphere is 4 x the area of the circle in the sphere or 4 x pi x radius squared.<div>

    Attention: This is typical because the students are making a mess with the juice from the oranges. Also, the paper gets sticky and wet. So this is outside the clean structure that is typically seen in math.

    Generation: The connection of peeling an orange and understanding the orange peel represents the surface area of the orange. It gives a concrete example of a surface area outside wrapping paper and cardboard to make a box.

    Emotion: It gives a math event that is easy to show a success. It allows students to connect what they know about surface area, spheres, and citrus fruit. It goes through the 3-part-framework that is not giving away the formula for surface area. It also gives the students autonomy because they fill the circle with the orange peel.

    Spacing: This is an excellent connection to other learned concepts, like finding the area of a circle, Finding the surface area of different solids, and calculating with the value of pi.

    I know this does not follow the three-part framework completely, but I think the experience gives the students a math memory that will stick with them. Typically after this experience, students do a great job finding the surface area of a sphere.

    </div>

    • azuka ojini

      Member
      July 9, 2021 at 11:30 pm

      I can only imagine that the students will not see orange peels the same way anymore after the exercise.

      Thanks for your post.

  • John Gaspari

    Member
    March 14, 2021 at 11:35 am

    Lesson Focus: The goal of the lesson is to describe how much 1 000 000 is in terms of other values. So, the focus is on the magnitude of 1 000 000 in relation to other numbers and representations that students are comfortable with.

    Attention:

    My lesson would work off of a lesson from the MathUp online textbook/resource by Marian Small. It begins with a video for a Minds On activity having to do with how long it would take for a school to drink 10 000 L of water. The Minds On activity is done well in that it does attempt to spark curiosity with a video and some withholding of information and then asking students step by step what information they needed to obtain to solve the problem. I would change this activity to sparking further curiosity by playing the video without sound (some info is provided in the video) and doing a Notice and Wonder that will hopefully lead to students to ask how much water do students drink in a day or something related to the Minds On activity that is set up. This would provide more attention to the task and may even lead to other math questions different from the textbook that students would want to figure out.

    Generation:

    This lesson from MathUp does work with connecting ideas from the understanding of the number 10 000 to help students work with and understand the magnitude of 1 000 000. The activity (Action Task) in the lesson that works with 1 000 000 parallels the Minds On activity and also works with relatable scenarios for the students.

    Emotions:

    Since I have incorporated many of the concepts of “Building Thinking Classrooms” by Peter Liljedahl such as random groups of 3 working on vertical non-permanent surface, rich low floor/high ceiling tasks, and not answering proximity questions but only questions that advance student learning, I think this learning experience will effectively evoke emotion.

    Spacing:

    I will continue to return to working with numbers of larger or smaller magnitude (decimal numbers) throughout the rest of the year. The concepts learned will continue to be reviewed when students learn to apply different operations with larger numbers.

    • azuka ojini

      Member
      July 9, 2021 at 11:32 pm

      After reading your post, the power of ten came to mind.

      Thanks

  • DAVID DIEHL

    Member
    March 18, 2021 at 9:46 am

    For systems of equations the elimination method

    Attention – I will offer a HW pass to anyone that can guess my numbers. They have a sum 12 and a difference of 53.

    Generate – students have seen a problem like this before but the numbers were much easier. They know we can graph problems like this and they can try that method.

    Emotion – I let them know that they can share ideas basically allowing them to work together so everyone can earn it if one person can get it and explain it to someone else, then explain it to more people. The emotion of working together towards a common goal.

    Spacing – we will review the graphs of the simpler guess my numbers and once a month we will do a math jeopardy game for smaller prizez where guess my number is a category

    • Jeremiah Barrett

      Member
      June 9, 2021 at 12:26 pm

      This sounds really fun David. At this point, are students writing equations yet or is mostly guess and check?

  • Selena Gallagher

    Member
    March 25, 2021 at 8:12 am

    I’m just about to head out for a much-needed Spring Break so I’m not thinking of a specific task, but reflecting on the AGES model in general. I can see how it nicely aligns with the Making Math Moments framework, especially the Curiosity Pathway and the Fueling Sense Making. I think the spacing idea is interesting and it’s an idea I’ve been hearing about a lot. I’m looking forward to learning more about it, but I’m also feeling that it would be a bit overwhelming to have to try to re-order an entire year’s curriculum. We follow the Eureka curriculum in our elementary school, and it is very prescriptive, with daily lessons. I already have some ideas from the rest of this course about how I might re-organise some of the content within each day’s lesson, but thinking about re-organising a whole unit, let alone a whole year is very scary indeed!

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      March 26, 2021 at 7:20 am

      Spacing is definitely an idea that can be approach various ways… so don’t overthink it. You want it to be manageable for you and helpful for students. If you put yourself too far out of your comfort / confidence zone, you might do more harm than good. Just start thinking of what that might look like or sound like for you and your students…

    • Lori Plate

      Member
      July 14, 2021 at 5:44 pm

      I have had similar thoughts to yours about rearranging things in the textbook. The last two years, my middle school has done a block schedule with 103 minute classes (UGHH). This meant we were supposed to get through approximately two lessons a day for students who are below grade level and hate math, and they only had math every other day causing many to not have a clue what we had done the previous class period.

      To help eliminate some of that loss and to help monitor the Covid situation, last year, my school chose to have students in cohorts and interact with as few adults as possible for contact tracing. This meant that students only had two core classes each quarter, which required us to basically get through a semester of content in one quarter, again with 103 minute classes.

      This forced our hand into having to rearrange and prioritize our textbook, CPM. Since I work with 8th graders, we had to make sure we covered, or at least exposed, students to what they definitely needed for Algebra in high school. The other 8th grade teacher at my school also taught Algebra so she knew what content they had to know moving forward, which made it easier for us to rearrange the textbook.

      Another thing we looked at were the Priority Standards for our grade level and made sure we covered those.

  • Laura Las Heras Ruiz

    Member
    April 22, 2021 at 10:15 am

    I’ve been teaching about functions. My plan in the last years was:

    – linear functions.

    – quadratic functions.

    -Hyperbolic functions.

    – Exponential functions.

    – Other polynomial functions.

    – periodic functions.

    -Analysis the functions (domain, increase and decrease, maximums and minimums…)

    I’ve changed the plan:

    FROM SITUATIONS TO THEIR MATH REPRESENTATION.

    – Understand, solve and represent proportional problems.

    – Collecting data from a different situations see the path of the data, and: by hand and then with geogebra see the path of the functions and the algebra of the function, and even the analysis of the function. (one of the lessons I did it with the donuts)

    – Understand, solve and represent non proportional problems. Beginning with the problem not with the data.

    FROM THEIR MATH REPRESENTATIONS TO A POSSIBLE SITUATION.

    – After all the generating work that we have done In my lasts lessons I just give this equation to do a notice and wonder y=20+100·0.7<sup>x</sup> . It was fantastic to see that they have thinks to notice and wonder, they want to know the shape, and why “y” can’t be less than 20. And lots of thinks more I have prepared to show that situation could be a temperature decreasing of an iron but they think about level of decibels when I try to make them to be quiet or a population decrease of some animal.

    -We will do some more activities relating this with geometry.

    I think that I have to learn a lot about how spacing the concepts ans skills. I hope being on the way.

  • Jeremiah Barrett

    Member
    June 9, 2021 at 12:23 pm

    My attempt at AGES is going to be a scatter plot lesson where students investigate the relationship between two sets of data. First, to generate attention and spark curiosity I am going to have a student measure my height and arm span and record the data. Students will then be asked to discuss with a neighbor whether or not they feel height and arm span are related. I will then explain to students that they will be gathering the same data of classmates while working in small groups. Students will gather data in groups and then create tables and graphs individually. Students will enjoy the measuring and group work portion of the assignment. After creating tables and graphs I will ask students to discuss with their groups what they are noticing. Many students will notice a positive trend between an increase in height and increase in arm span. Lastly, as an extension I will ask groups to estimate the arm spans of some of their favorite basketball players (based on their heights) and create a scatter plot of this data and compare it to the class data.

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      June 10, 2021 at 6:58 am

      Thanks a ton for sharing! Let us know how it goes!

    • Linda Andres

      Member
      August 2, 2021 at 3:47 pm

      This is a lesson I would have enjoyed in school. I know how much students enjoy interaction with their teacher. The opportunity to measure the teacher and each other would be fun but also gives real-world data.

  • Kathleen Bourne

    Member
    June 16, 2021 at 1:17 pm

    I’m going to use the Shelves activity. I’m going to get their attention with the video and generate the facts we already know about angle relationships. A few of my students pay close attention during Notice and Wonder and will participate when they don’t usually. My hope is that they will have some “aha” moments when they connect with what we’ve been reviewing which will build their confidence. If they seem ready, I’ll use a Knowledgehook mission about angles that we’ve tried in advance, to see if they are more successful. If not, then we’ll look at building some other examples. I like the idea of allowing students who understand to make a new problem (involving some other real-life scenario) while I continue working with those who are still not quite there.

    • Jon Orr

      Administrator
      June 17, 2021 at 6:22 am

      Let us know how it goes @kathleen.bourne … review the Teacher guide on that task as it will help you help your students make those connections.

      • Kathleen Bourne

        Member
        June 21, 2021 at 1:16 pm

        Well, Grade 8s in the last week and a half of school… it went. It took two tries on two different days for a few kids to go beyond Notice and Wonder. Interestingly, it was my lowest performing student who brought up the idea of the shelves being level! It was great to be able to circle her ideas and say “YES! That’s something interesting we can explore using angles!” I will continue with the Knowledgehook mission “do over” to see if more of them make the connection, but ultimately, I’ll be trying this next year when my audience is a little “fresher” and we’ll see if we can be a little more into the problem

      • Kyle Pearce

        Administrator
        June 25, 2021 at 6:50 am

        Definitely a tougher time to try to implement a new protocol, but so happy you did! Even with fresh friends, you’ll notice that it will take time to build that culture of learners who are truly open to sharing their thoughts without fear of judgement. You’ve got this!

  • Diane Fortune

    Member
    June 24, 2021 at 11:52 am

    The idea of re-ordering my curriculum (which I am required to teach) seems daunting. I totally agree with the ineffectiveness of consolidating one topic of learning into a two week time period. I also do a “morning work” routine and lots of Number Talk activities to try to keep ideas / learning fresh. I would love to know the best way to reorganize my curriculum but I feel like I need something to hold on to or a map that would give me some place to start.

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      June 25, 2021 at 6:53 am

      You’re right that the reorganization of any curriculum can be daunting. One thing you can do to start is just take the first few days of each unit and use those as your mini units to keep things fresh.
      I’m in the process right now of taking new standards from the Ontario curriculum and spiralling those. This is challenging despite having done this type of work in the past. I tend to take the overall expectations or standards and start to order them in a progression. Then I start to “chunk” them. Then I start to mix the chunks in the order of progression. I find it to be really helpful.

  • Gerilyn Stolberg

    Member
    June 29, 2021 at 10:09 am

    I will be starting summer school next week and I will be working with students who finished first grade during remote learning. I don’t yet know my students as they will be a group from across the district and I don’t usually teach this grade. I have looked at the standards that should have been addressed in first grade and I will be working on place value to 100. I have created a variety of interactive experiences for my students. We will begin with skip counting by ones starting at a variety of numbers students will pass a beanbag while they are counting (this will hopefully give me a chance to see if rote counting has been achieved- although I know that this does not mean that they understand place value it will help me see if they understand the vocabulary of the numbers). Next we will play Number HeadBandz- students will receive a number under 100 in their head band and will need to ask peers yes/no questions to figure out the number they have (Hopefully questions such as Is it a one digit number? tow digit number? Is there more than 1 ten? Are they 3 tens? Are there 4 ones? will come out.) I will provide students with a whiteboard to keep track of their questions and answers. I will also have base ten blocks and place value discs out for students who choose to use them. In centers students will work on activities where they will put together 100 chart puzzles (100 charts that have been cut into pieces and students will need to put in order), popsicle I have…who has…? (Students will receive popsicles with numbers and clues, they will read the clue and the student with the number that matches the clue shows their stick and reads their clue (I have 53 who has 4 tens and 3 ones). In our class number talk students will be asked to add/subtract 1 and 10 from a given number, I will ask students to show their strategies for solving these equations. (49 + 1, 49 – 1, 49 +10, 49 – 10) Students will be asked to use concrete manipulatives and drawings to explain their thinking.

    Students will then create a Numbers of Me Cut Out- Students will receive a paper person cut out- they will come up with as many numbers as they can that describe them (Examples: 7- born in July, 21- my birthday, 9- number of brothers, 5- number of sisters, 29- my house #, 47- my age, 3- number of children I have, 12- my basketball number). Students will create a person and share the numbers that represent them.

    I am hoping that the kinesthetic aspects of these activities as well as the social piece will gain student attention.

  • Anthony Waslaske

    Member
    July 1, 2021 at 11:32 pm

    One of the lessons I plan on delivering is Charge! The image above is what students first see following the questions: “What do you notice?”, “What do you wonder about?” The process of taking every students’ response exhibits fairness and autonomy since there are no wrong answers here. Students also have the perception that they drive the learning bus. They decide the direction class takes based on their responses. This is followed by the question from the students’ responses, “When will the phone be fully charged?” Students are invited again to choose a value they believe is too low, too high, and just right. The Curiosity Path commands attention from the AGES model.

    From students’ estimations, a bit more information from the problem is revealed by including screenshots at 9:10. Students are given a few minutes to pause and think about a strategy they could use privately before working with a randomly assigned partner. Additionally, students are applying existing knowledge to a novel problem which will eventually lay the foundation to apply new learning. Each of these practices contributes to generation in the AGES Model.

    As students discuss in pairs and receive teacher feedback verbally; “How does a non-proportional problem affect the strategies you use to solve this problem?” , “What do you know about the problem so far?” , “How can you represent the given information in a new way?”; it gives students a sense of status. Students are also going to feel excited, lost, and empowered during the productive struggle. Especially when two additional screenshots are revealed and students see how the points no longer create a constant rate of change because the points are more like a scatterplot.

    Then before students become frustrated with increasing levels of rigor, consolidation relieves that tension. Consolidation is also a great place to spiral and connect to previous content to keeps students from sliding too far on the forgetfulness curve. These short reminders are a commitment to spacing in the AGES model.

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      July 2, 2021 at 7:51 am

      Great way to reflect on the AGES model by summarizing what you’ve been learning throughout the course! That’ll surely help it stick and make it easier to put into practice each day!

    • Betsy Lesley

      Member
      August 9, 2021 at 12:38 pm

      Anthony,

      I plan to use Charge! with my 7th graders, your insights were very helpful. Scatter plot isn’t something I had considered. Thanks tons!

  • Anthony Waslaske

    Member
    July 1, 2021 at 11:40 pm

    I really like how engaging Jackilyn Wolford lesson is because the act of catching bubbles on construction paper will create memories along with all the physical movement. Additionally, all the randomness of each bubble landing on the construction paper no two students papers will be the same. Along the AGES model that is Emotion for sure, playing to a sense of Autonomy and Relatedness in SCARF. I wonder, though, could keeping the task open instead of asking students to confine to a table add more autonomy and make the activity more memorable?

  • Penny Johansson

    Member
    July 2, 2021 at 4:13 pm

    Estimation Lessons: (a container throughout the year is filled with different objects that students estimate.

    Attention:

    -Introduce an empty container and put a bouncy ball in it

    -What do you Notice and Wonder?

    Generation:

    -High and low estimation and best guess

    -Ask what more information would you like to improve your estimates

    then add a few more bouncy balls

    -re-estimate

    fill the container with bouncy balls, without counting

    -re-estimate

    Emotion:

    -Count bouncy balls

    -Closest prediction gets to pick another class to give each student a bouncy ball (small school, kids know each other (siblings, cousins, sports teams)) (kindness activity)

    Spacing:

    -Throughout the year, with different objects.

  • Andrea Cadman

    Member
    July 6, 2021 at 6:07 pm

    Thinking generally…

    ATTENTION: following the motto of sparking curiosity, getting kids up and moving, doing something novel (like with the bubbles or throwing wadded pieces of paper)

    GENERATION: after getting their attention, we have to make sure that they buy into the context and have a reason to want to do math to solve a problem. I like the analogy of ‘giving them a headache to make them want to take the medicine”. Using the 3-part framework gives the students a reason to do the work other than the threat of non-compliance or the reward of grades. When they want to do something, they will generate strategies that build on things they already know in their quest to find the answer.

    EMOTION: Making something meaningful, fun, relevant, different, special, etc., will help to make the new content stick for retention

    SPACING: I feel better about being able to do this now that I have seen how to bring out different content from a single task. By being able to point out connections in a current task with concepts that came previously and/or by presenting tasks to students that ‘require’ them to use prior concepts to solve the current problem, I am not required to come up with additional lessons to spiral, reteach, or remind students of the past work done in class. Of these four components, the spacing aspect always felt the most daunting because the way I was trying to do it took a lot of my time to prep and took extra time from the class that I really didn’t have to give. Making the spiraling a part of the current work makes so much sense.

  • azuka ojini

    Member
    July 9, 2021 at 11:00 pm

    The AGES of learning model would serve two purposes, and with the elements of proceeding or pivoting, I would introduce inequality at the beginning of the school year, and get the students to know about each other.

    Attention: The challenge is for students to share their opinion after observing the zodiac signs.

    Generation: Stretching out the signs, the students will place a mark to identify their zodiac sign, in relation to their classmate. The data collected will serve as source for prior knowledge for multiple concepts

    Emotion:

    S: No two students are the same. The sign might be the same, but the other day might be different. In the event they need clarification, then I will mediate the situation, without solving the problem for them. They have struggle to determine who is older.

    C: Certainly, all my students are destined by the gods, astrologically, to succeed.

    A: They are autonomous, and the stage is now set, and as the director should go at their own pace.

    R: They are next to other students that might see a problem from a different point of view.

    F: The different point of view should encourage collaboration to help build a growth mindset of community of learners.

  • Terri Bond

    Member
    July 10, 2021 at 11:39 pm

    Since it is summer break, I can’t really pick a lesson that I will each this week. So I think I’ll respond to this lesson as a general framework as to how I intend to structure math when I return to school. It will also be different for me because I will be in the Interventionist role and will work with students K-5, so perhaps a general framework is the best way to go for now.

    ATTENTION – I am very excited about implementing the Curiosity Path to grab and keep attention! This will work at any grade level, and I’m hoping that teachers in all grade levels will be willing to let me co-teach lessons using this format. I know it is powerful because every time I watched one of the lessons in this course, I was fully engaged! I also hope that some of them will allow me to use the Learning Goal Progression, Anticipating, Selecting, and Sequencing strategy with them as we plan the lesson. Together we can decide to Proceed or Pivot! I love how all this is fitting together!!

    GENERATION – I think this is the area in which I am already pretty strong. I almost always give kids time to engage with each other, visualize, draw, reflect, represent, talk, and solve problems their own way. It’s very powerful and exciting to see each student WANT to show the work they generated. I often see them helping each other find even more solutions together, and teaching one another.

    EMOTION – I fully believe that vivid memories have a strong correlation with emotion. So we try to laugh a lot! Curiosity can spark strong emotion as well, so there are many levels at which emotion can and should be induced. The SCARF acronym is something else to keep in mind with relevant feedback for status, building choice and confidence for certainty and autonomy, and making lessons related to student experience and their sense of fairness. I will say that right now, as I write this, without any particular students in mind, this does feel theoretical, but my common sense and years of experience tell me that it WILL impact all students if I plan with all this in mind.

    SPACING – I completely believe in, and have taught, a math curriculum that is designed to leverage the power of spacing! However, some districts have mandatory pacing guides that are not designed for spaced learning. It’s difficult to space learning when high-stakes, district-wide assessments, that are tied to the set pacing guide, are required.

    Often, student data from these mandatory assessments is reported and scrutinized at all levels in the district, so teachers have to stay with the pace. These assessments often use questions from released, end-of-year standardized state tests, so for teachers, there is a need to teach concepts to the end-of-year level the first time around, or it feels like you haven’t done your job and students didn’t achieve.

    Pacing instead of Spacing is usually very demanding and fast. Topics, units, and skills may not necessarily be scheduled to be reviewed in the pacing guide. Hopefully one of the other lessons in this module will help teachers in a situation like this figure out ways to space while pacing. Whenever I have been in this situation, two ways I have found to make sure there is some spacing is to build it in to homework, and also include reviewing in daily warm-ups. I know there must be other ways that I hope to learn in upcoming lessons!

    • Jon Orr

      Administrator
      July 13, 2021 at 7:36 am

      Great summary here @terri.bond If teachers are paced at the district level then you’re right, we’ll want to find ways to space inside that pacing. Warm ups is one way I do it and it only takes a few minutes at the start of each day. Another is lagged practice work. Create your own practice set that has some practice from the learning goal of that day and some from other parts of the course.

    • Lisamarie Barnes

      Member
      July 18, 2021 at 12:30 pm

      I can relate to the spacing challenges…during my first year of teaching, district pacing guides and standardized testing determined when and how long we had to review and introduce new concepts. The stress was evident on me and my students (at times counter productive and frustrating). I typically found myself behind since I chose to extend, reteach, and pivot in hope of fostering true understanding. (Intervention and tutoring was when I felt the most productive.) With our state’s test results in the spotlight due to the pandemic, non-educators are starting to see what we as teachers have always known.

  • Terri Bond

    Member
    July 11, 2021 at 12:06 am

    Hi Selena,

    I am also thinking about this response as a general model for now since it is summer. Like you, I am seeing how all the concepts we’ve been learning in this course are fitting together, and I am very excited about implementing the ideas next school year.

    I also agree with you that working out the spacing is the overwhelming part. Spacing / Spiraling is very good for learners according to what many researchers have found, so I know it’s the way to go. Since you mentioned a particular curriculum (Eureka) I will too. In one of my previous teaching assignments, we used a spaced curriculum called Origo which was producing fearless, confident, and very social math students. Unfortunately it was the year of COVID, so just as we got going, the year shut down.

  • Lori Plate

    Member
    July 14, 2021 at 5:25 pm

    The lesson is from the 8<sup>th</sup> grade CPM curriculum titled, “What is a Variable?” This lesson is the first day students will be working with algebra tiles. Students are expected to learn the names of the tiles, their relationships with each other, and how to rewrite a collection of tiles in a more efficient way than listing each tile (combining like terms).

    I feel this lesson gets students’ ATTENTION because most love playing with them and creating designs. It also leads itself quite nicely into the curiosity pathway for notice and wonder.

    Before showing the class a pile of tiles, I would call one person over from each team and explain that they will be the Recorder/Reporter for this part of the activity. Their role would be to note what their team did once they received the skittles or M&Ms, including writing their amount of what they have. Each team would get the same amount of each color so we can talk about the order of how they listed them and whether or not each group had the same amount. We would also discuss if what easy deciding how to label the different colors and why it is important to do that and connect it to the purpose for naming the tiles in a universal way.

    After students were familiar with the names of the tiles, I would move into using small piles of tiles to begin with and increasing the difficulty of the problems. Students would be expected to make their own prediction of the contents of the pile and share them with their partner or team, before sharing out with the class. I would ask the teams to GENERATE ideas of how this activity fit with the candy.

    We would then change the order of the activity by giving students algebraic expressions and ask students to lay out what is listed and if there is a way that the expressions could be simplified more. A discussion of why students think they might want to simplify the expressions more would follow.

    To bring in EMOTION, I would do some type of competition between the teams, having questions that relate to both of the skills practiced. There would be some type of reward for the winning team.

    SPACING of this lesson comes naturally in this course because a majority of what follows is solving equations, which requires you to be able to recognize and combine like terms.

  • Lisamarie Barnes

    Member
    July 18, 2021 at 1:13 pm

    Its Summer Break and will not be able to apply this until we return to school in the fall. So, here is my understanding of the importance of the AGES Model:

    ATTENTION: This was something my professors drilled into us. Every time I submitted a lesson plan, it had to include a detailed description of how students would be drawn into the day’s learning. Sometimes it was through a read aloud, a game, or a mystery box. Sparking curiosity and keeping younger students attention has to be brief but well planed.

    GENERATION: Students love to share their thinking! At times I am guilty of over sharing my thinking. So I will adapt my lessons to be student centered by withholding information and increasing opportunities to develop their autonomy. As a side effect, this my lead to a decrease of unwanted behavior.

    EMOTION: This was something else my professors focused on. Children (anyone) only have the ability to learn when they feel safe and loved…this begins with a learning environment that accepts others options, practices growth mindset, and thrives on positive feedback.

    SPACING: I’m looking forward to learning how this can be accomplished when my district has a ridged pacing guide and multiple standardized test to measure student’s learning and teacher’s ability.

  • Ella Platt

    Member
    July 20, 2021 at 1:42 pm

    Summer Break: no current lessons

    Ages

    Attention: Curiosity pathway- withholding information, notice and wonder, estimation, anticipation

    Generation: have students generate ideas – DON’T be the hero. Let them come up with ideas.

    Emotion: Students need to feel safe enough to participate and love enough that mistakes are acceptable

    Spacing: plan when we will come back and revisit this and find other connections to real life math or future uses in class.

    • Serina Signorello

      Member
      September 7, 2021 at 9:29 pm

      Ella,

      I agree that it is important to build a growth mindset from the beginning. I plan to talk with the students about growth mindset on the first week of school. I am currently reading Carol Dweck’s Mindset book and I’ve been using the growth mindset philosophy for a few years now. Even last year, my constant positive outlook and growth mindset was able to help some students who struggled greatly to feel they were capable if they worked hard.

  • Holly Dybvig

    Member
    July 25, 2021 at 10:25 pm

    Something that the majority of math scholars are intimidated by is FRACTIONS. Students see a fraction and IMMEDIATELY move on to the next question. I felt the same for many years. Because students feel so strongly against fractions I will need something BIG to gain their attention and immediately start those good feelings.

    I would start with a series of activities and give students a choice over which activity the attempt. 1. Drawing 2. push-ups 3. sit-ups 4. reading a book, etc.

    I would have the activity timed and tell them to complete as much as possible in the time limit, such as a minute or 30 seconds. There would be an end amount and they would continue the activity and either complete more than was requested or less than what was requested.

    I would then ask them some thinking questions, such as by another time (more or less), how much of the activity would be completed. If student A completed half of the amount of student B, how many would that be? And any other questions that would spark changing the numbers.

    We would then take the part they completed and place it over the whole amount that was requested and see that it makes a fraction. We would continue discovering that all of the work they did to figure out the previous questions was fraction work and how well they did.

    This would hopefully boost their confidence and hopefully organically connect to other lessons such as ratios, LCM, GCF, dividing and multiplying fractions, and so much more that just looking at “scary” numbers. I think students are mostly overwhelmed by fractions because they can’t actually visualize themselves using fractions, especially when they are doing it unknowingly.

    • Mary Herbst

      Member
      August 9, 2021 at 9:35 am

      Holly, you are spot on with the intimidation factor of fractions – I love how your attention hook puts them in the middle of the activity without the anxiety of it being a fraction lesson!

  • Marjorie Allred

    Member
    July 27, 2021 at 6:19 pm

    When school starts next month, I intend to begin with a review of fraction operations. I am going to do the Protein Shake task to introduce this. I will get their attention by showing the introductory video and asking them what they notice and wonder. Showing the second video with an additional notice and wonder can get them started generating ideas on how to figure out how much powder is needed to make three shakes. Encouraging them in their work can give them positive feelings about working on the problem. When they have found how much is needed for three, I will have them figure out what will be needed for one and a half shakes. Later in the week, I will have them modify a couple of recipes to find the quantities of the ingredients when you only have 2 of the 3 eggs called for in a cookie recipe and another recipe where you need to make one and a half times the recipe. This spacing can help them reinforce the concepts we are trying to learn.

  • Marjorie Allred

    Member
    July 27, 2021 at 6:40 pm

    This may be the second time I post this. I thought I had posted it and now I can’t see it.

    When school starts next month, I plan to do a review of fraction operations. I will do the Protein Shakes task where students need to find how much powder it will take to make three protein shakes when one shake takes 3/4 of a scoop. I can get their attention by showing the video and having them notice and wonder about it. We will generate student thinking by having them work on the problem and then do the extension of finding how much it will take to make one and a half shakes. Giving positive, encouraging comments can bring positive emotions into the classroom. Spacing can be achieved by coming back to the problem in a few days and having them find how many scoops will be need for 8 shakes and how many shakes can be made with 12-1/2 scoops. We will also solidify the learning by having them modify recipes where 2/3 of the recipe is wanted and 1-1/2 times another recipe is needed.

    I like using cooking to teach fractions because they never say, “When will I ever use that?”

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      July 28, 2021 at 6:42 am

      Love it! Great task and it sounds like you’ve got it all worked out from a curiosity perspective.
      Consider checking out Shovelling the Driveway, Salting the Driveway and Pizza Party for multiplication and division of fractions, too!

      • Marjorie Allred

        Member
        August 2, 2021 at 5:41 pm

        Thanks. I will check them out.

  • Linda Andres

    Member
    August 2, 2021 at 3:42 pm

    Throughout this course, I have been focusing on patterning as my introductory concept for math. I am going to use this as a way to reflect on what I am planning. These are brief reflections as my eyes are having some problems right now so I have limited time on the computer.

    Attention – I have several manipulatives and tools to allow students to show me what they know about patterning. These include connecting cubes, pattern blocks, stamps and stamp pads, stickers, etc. I am thinking of starting the experience by setting up learning centres with each type of representation and circulating so that students can experience the materials and I can listen and question. I will be using the idea of visible random grouping from Peter Lilhedahl’s book so that group choice will play less of a factor.

    Generation – students will interact with the materials as a group and individually. I will be walking around with questions. Notecards will be available for students or groups who want to draw their patterns.

    Emotions – From experience, I know the kids in grade 3 enjoy making things with their hands and are excited to show what they make to their new teacher. Where I am going to be learning here is by helping them comment and own their own works instead of setting up a feeling of hierarchy or results. I know how easy it is to fall into the standard of judging and want to ignite the student’s love of math and belief in their ability to learn.

    Spacing – Though I will be starting with patterning, it will return in the order of place value, in skip counting, in all aspects of math. That is why I want to start here. Set a concept of math as patterns in motion will give that mental link to tie new concepts to throughout the year.


  • Tracy Arriola

    Member
    August 8, 2021 at 8:02 pm

    Place Value to the billions is the first lesson in 4th grade.

    Attention- Start of with neighbor story of place value. Each period is a different house on the street. Each house have three children with the first names of ones, tens, and hundreds. We look at the importance of using their last names with their first name.

    Generation- Time to pull out the place value discs to look at the value of each digit. This helps with expanded form and notation. Work on What number am I? activities. Students will find numbers that follow all of the rules.

    Emotion- Students working in groups with other that help support them as the build their understanding of larger numbers. Each group create a poster with a number at their level that shows the number in different ways (standard form, word form, expanded form, expanded notation).

    Spacing- With our pacing guide set for us, I think the best way is by using spiraled warm-ups.

  • Tringle Witt

    Member
    August 9, 2021 at 9:19 am

    I probably spent more time figuring out how to post this than I did creating it. First unit High School Geometry, measuring using non-standard units. (really determining what congruent means and notation for congruent vs. same length objects)

    https://planboard.it/7f0fc94b-f4b8-4467-84d7-d5ff189ef20e

  • Mary Herbst

    Member
    August 9, 2021 at 9:41 am

    I think I’m starting off the year in 7th grade with rates. I like to use a heart rate activity, and to gain attention I could have students choose to do a variety of tasks for two minutes – read, draw, do a TikTok dance, sit-ups, etc… afterwards we’d take their heart rate for 20 seconds and use the data to find the unit rate of beats/min as well as how many times would a heart beat in 2 minutes/5 minutes? We’d discuss the differences in students’ numbers – what would make your heart race, what is the most restful?

  • Betsy Lesley

    Member
    August 9, 2021 at 12:32 pm

    This fall, one of my early topics with my 6th graders will be reviewing the Order of Operations, and since my students come from a variety of schools, they will know it as PEMDAS, GEMS… or some other acronym. Based on past experience, they are NOT familiar with the term “Order of Operations,” just the tricky mnemonics.

    I plan to use the Desmos activity: Twin Puzzles.

    I do these activities using the pacing tool, so students don’t race ahead, and will stop them to share solutions with a buddy, then we will share as a class (like a Notice/Wonder)

    A: I’m confident these “math puzzles” will capture students’ attention, with missing operations symbols.

    G: Students will generate new connections when they recall/realize that not all problems are solved by simply working left to right. (And when they recall using grouping symbols to overcome that obstacle.)

    E: Sharing ideas with a partner will help provide the emotional experience.

    S: At the end of the activity students create their own Twin Puzzles, which I will then share with the class as warmups / early finisher work / Friday Challenges during the following weeks.

  • Vanessa Weske

    Member
    August 12, 2021 at 6:50 pm

    Our 6th grade teachers are starting Number System with 6.NS.2 on fluently dividing multi-digit numbers using standard algorithm. I looked for a 3 act math task and found Niagara Falls. For “Attention” the teacher can show the video and ask students what they notice/wonder and discuss responses. For “Generation” the students’ learning is active from the start and continues through the question & estimation and then partial reveal & update portions. Discussing students’ strategies, sharing and celebrating stimulates the “Emotion” piece of the AGES learning model. Which it also does by facilitating the SCARF elements of status (honoring student responses), autonomy, and relatedness. For “Spacing” the task and learning and students’ experiences and methods should be revisited and referenced in successive lessons as well as extension opportunities utilized.

    https://learn.makemathmoments.com/task/niagara-falls/

    Niagara Falls

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      August 13, 2021 at 7:28 am

      Great job making connections to the AGES model! Let us know how the task goes when you run it! What worked? What would you change?

    • Jenn Stuart

      Member
      August 14, 2021 at 9:22 am

      I love this activity. I think using an Ontario landmark that most students have either seen in person or have heard of will help increase the emotion and then the curiosity of the lesson.

  • Jenn Stuart

    Member
    August 14, 2021 at 9:21 am

    I love all the ideas above. Before going on summer break, my new teaching partner and I were chatting about spiralling. We discussed how we would like to try it since it made more sense for learning. I am still not sure entirely how to implement it. I know it’s coming up in the next lesson ( I am looking forward to that.)

    I understand the importance of the need to find a practice to help concrete my learning, I am struggling with finding a valuable idea. I don’t know the kids I will be teaching and I have very little idea of where they actually are on their understanding. I think I am going to be starting with making numbers. Have the students show numbers using concrete tools or visuals. they may have to create a math sentence or something along the lines to show the decomposition of larger and smaller numbers. I find students in grades 6 and 7 struggle with understanding place value and that impacts their understanding of decimals when we move to them.

    • Jon Orr

      Administrator
      August 15, 2021 at 8:12 am

      Good for you taking on the idea of spiralling. Waiting to see where the students are an important move when spiralling. We can plan where our tasks and activities are but we have to build off where our students are so we can push them forward. We’re here for help along the way! p.s. We have a course on Spiralling that digs a bit deeper than the lessons we’ve shared here in this course.

  • Velia Kearns

    Member
    August 15, 2021 at 10:21 pm

    Attention – This would be your first video (refrain information) – Notice & Wonder
    Generation – This would be the Fueling the Understanding (2nd Video and Estimation)
    Emotion – Work through a problem (Vertical Learning) – (3rd Video – trying to use the new learning and apply.
    Spacing – Bring the learning back to the forefront (Referral to the learning & the experience in future lessons that are related)

  • Jeff Harvey

    Member
    August 17, 2021 at 3:02 pm

    I am not teaching for a while, so here is just me making sense of the AGES model with what Jon and Kyle have been teaching us.


    Attention: Know what students prior knowledge is and anticipate their solutions to an interesting problem that holds the expectation high will increase attention. By withholding information and running a Notice and Wonder we increase that tension and desire to be curious.

    Generation: Fuel sense making by focusing in on a question related to the learning goal and getting estimates (also works for emotion and attention categories) and allowing students time to work on the problem and make sense of it. While monitoring their work, provide feedback/just in time scaffolding through questioning, while at the same time thinking about possible sequencing of student responses for the conversations to ensue.

    Emotion: Using Instructional Intelligences (Think-Pair Share / Group work on VNPS Gallery Walk and student conversations in the class around solutions we are engaging them in social activities which increases their ability to remember the events.

    Spacing: To link this lesson to past lessons and also future ones in various by hitting similar big ideas and linking them with new ones so that connections can be made and long term retention is made since students understand mathematics conceptually.

  • Denny Nelson

    Member
    August 18, 2021 at 8:48 pm

    Since it is summer I can’t pick a specific math lesson this week. I am teaching at my church. I’ll have to speak in both general and specific ways.

    Attention: I need to make sure I have less text over all especially if I am talking while I have a slide up. I can have images that relate or reinforce what I’m saying but I really need less words on the slides / just in general.

    Generation I do need to help students to find ways that they can apply what they are learning and make it relevant for them. I did read the first bonus article but I do want to look up the “Math Council” especially given the diverse nature of my student population. I have had conversations with my students about social just issues including bringing up books / movies like “Just Mercy” and other things. I guess my math tie in I do talk about the statistics and how some things just aren’t fair right now and it will take many of us being aware and speaking and listening to get things to change.

    Emotion is somewhat addressed by what I said in the previous section. I do have a bit of a more conversational approach. I do need to do better about connecting with and understanding where all my students come from. And I need to help make sure connections are made for all with their own stories. We do sometimes end up with “in class jokes” based on things that happen in math class. We’ll say we’re using “so-and-so’s technique” or “that-person’s” method to look at a problem. It could be a running conversion for week.

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      August 19, 2021 at 6:57 am

      You’ve done a great job connecting these ideas to your own context currently. You’ll be in a great spot when you begin the new school year to apply these ideas moving forward. Nice!

  • Denny Nelson

    Member
    August 18, 2021 at 8:51 pm

    Spacing I know you said you were going to do more with in the next lesson. I do understand that I don’t just want to do everything all together for 3 weeks … and rarely repeat it after that. This one is going to take more thought and intentionality. I am fortunate that it is still summer for me and I can do a little bit more big picture planning before the school year starts. But I do need to work on both my understanding and implementation here.

  • Serina Signorello

    Member
    September 7, 2021 at 9:22 pm

    Since my first week is going to include non-curricular tasks. I am choosing a task that I plan to use again this school year, camera case and pad of paper weigh in,

    Attention:

    The curiosity path is excellent for getting the students to start thinking and communicating right away with a notice and wonder. I love how this activity can be reused when solving systems of equations later in the year.

    Generation:

    As the students are working on this activity and creating models and putting pieces together they are engaging with the content. Students can also create their own example with a different amount of sticky notes or create their own example with different objects in the classroom.

    Emotion:

    Extension that students create their own example gives them autonomy.

    Spacing:

    Again I love how this task can be used to represent linear relationships in different ways (table, graph, and equations), write equations given two points, and solving systems of equations.

  • Jackilyn Wolford

    Member
    May 13, 2020 at 2:32 pm

    This sounds like a great lesson. I hope you were able to get your technology to work in order to present it! Were you able to have the students break into smaller groups? (Zoom?) and were you able to get some good feedback from your students?

    This lesson intrigued me and I’m curious how it went in the remote setting.

  • Kelli Fisher

    Member
    May 17, 2020 at 7:06 pm

    I think your lesson is great because not only are you making it fun, using the idea of a Treasure hunt, but the topic is a great way to move into Systems of Equations in the future. What type of solutions will you find with perpendicular lines?

    What solutions will you find with parallel lines ? This goes along with slope and equation of the line.

    There is alot your students can learn with this, keep attention, emotion positive and using the 3-part framework to enable the notice/wonder….estimation…..refining the answer, etc.

    FUN !

  • Nancy Van Hall

    Member
    June 5, 2020 at 2:38 am

    Reflection is tough! There are a few apps for school that allow students to reflect on their learning, what they had questions on and what they can do to better understand. One I have used is called Sown to Grow. It helps me to stay on top of their reflections better than paper and pencil. Also, a quick ticket out the door is another good option that takes just a few minutes of class.

  • Ericka Legnard

    Member
    June 15, 2020 at 11:57 am

    I agree, this is so hard with remote learning!

    One thing I tried that helped (though not quite the same) were having students post notice and wonders on padlets, and then comment on each other’s, kind of like we’re doing here. That was pretty effective. I could then take some kid responses, organize and highlight them, and then turn it into the opener for the next day. It’s definitely slower than it would be in class, because kids have a lot of time to complete them instead of doing them on the spot. If you were doing synchronous, that could work in real time.

    Another that I’m wondering about is having small groups be virtual. The management freaks me out. I don’t know my district’s plan yet for fall, but am thinking if some kids are in class and others are remote, that I could have kids in Zoom breakout rooms in class, so that a couple of kids in class could be online with a couple at home, and then those smaller discussions might work.

    I don’t know if that helps or not, but to me the collaboration piece is what will be the toughest. It’s SO important, and will be different this year for sure.

  • Teena Daniels

    Member
    June 16, 2020 at 12:02 pm

    I agree Justin. I know that these concepts and the idea of spirally is where I need to go, however, I am not sure how to encourage this type of thinking at home. I want students to feel their ideas are valued and I don’t want parents to feel that math is being taught in a whole new way. There is too much confusion going on right now.

  • Sheila Akinleye

    Member
    June 25, 2020 at 6:50 pm

    Hi Lyn,

    Thank you for this great reminder that repetition and flexibility, especially in this great time of uncertainty, are key to assisting students with distance-learning math. I am often so hard on my self and have unrealistic expectations because I want so much for my students to learn, but really sometimes the best way to help is to allow students as many opportunities as possible to understand a concept in a way that is as accessible and as interesting as we can make it.

  • Melanie Field

    Member
    January 3, 2021 at 5:05 pm

    This is great, Amy. The video provides a good story and context to base the lesson around. I think the students will come up with some good noticings and wonderings which will get them curious and engaged in the task.

  • John Gaspari

    Member
    March 14, 2021 at 12:51 pm

    Looks like you have a lot to work with the video you shared. Since I am also teaching grade 6 but in Canada, I think I will you use the same video to start my measurement unit and spiral it back to ratios and proportional reasoning that I have already covered. Thanks for sharing this great idea.

  • Scott McNutt

    Member
    March 8, 2021 at 8:24 pm

    I always like throwing paper in the air for activities. I feel this is a great kinesthetic move for students to go through. This is also where students who typically get in trouble for such things will thrive.

  • DAVID DIEHL

    Member
    March 18, 2021 at 9:38 am

    I like the “Guess my number activity where I give them a couple simple ones – what number am I thinking of – they have a sum of 10 and a difference of 2 and a bunch like that.

    Then I give them one like they have a sum of 8 and a difference of 52 whrre there are negatives or decimals involved and see the limits of the guess and check method.

    Then we over time investigate tables and students discover the intersection point as the answer then move to graphs and eventually we move to equations and the elimination method.

    It is just a thought on a task to get the idea of two constraints having to be met and it allows the ability to go back to the idea of points on a line fitting a constraint. Eventually it allows for an opening into getting an equation like x+y=8 in slope-intercept form and seeing the slope of -1 as every time one number goes up 1 the other has to decrease 1.

  • Selena Gallagher

    Member
    March 25, 2021 at 8:05 am

    You’ve probably moved on from long division by now, but I wanted to recommend the “7 – 11 – 13 Mystery.” It’s a great investigation that has students do A LOT of practice with long division while trying to solve the mystery of why this works and how division really works. Lots of great opportunities for questioning and sense-making.

    https://drive.google.com/file/d/1XmQzZagyDN0EINwsjLNhP12FO96QFX2k/view?usp=sharing

  • Michelle Grebe

    Member
    April 13, 2021 at 1:46 pm

    This is great! I was thinking of something along these lines with real world data that would be engaging.

  • Jeremiah Barrett

    Member
    June 9, 2021 at 12:25 pm

    Couldn’t agree with you more Scott. Anytime you are able to get students moving around, you get a better “buy in” on the activity.

  • Velia Kearns

    Member
    August 15, 2021 at 10:51 pm

    Hi David! I’m not sure if you’re referring to an activity posted on Kyle or Jon’s website.

    I would suggest to find a real-world application – maybe Birthdays, or Anniversaries.

    This might be more helpful with the Emotional aspect, for them to be able to recall the activity and the learning better another time. 😀

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