fbpx

Find answers, ask questions, and connect with our
community around the world.

Tagged: 

  • Lesson 3-6: Discussion Prompt

  • Kyle Pearce

    Administrator
    May 1, 2019 at 11:52 am

    Which tool(s) from this module (concrete manipulatives, multiple representations, visuals, and student generated solutions) do you found to be most useful to make the math more accessible for your students?

    Which will you try next week and how will you go about using it?

  • Daniel Whittaker

    Member
    July 12, 2019 at 9:05 pm

    Fun, you showed 3 different ways of seeing the problem.  My first one was different than all of them.  I saw it as a nxn square on the right Plus a 1xn on the left and a 1x(n-1) on the bottom.  So: n^2+n+n-1

    This was fun!

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 10 months ago by  Kyle Pearce.
  • Jody Soehner

    Member
    February 14, 2021 at 8:28 am

    I have used student generated answers quite a bit in my career and have found that it works best to have students explain an aspect of a concept or solution rather than the whole thing and I often give them a heads up about the aspect I will be asking them to explain and encourage them to flesh it out and rehearse before hand. I have students work on problems in pairs and consequently have them present in pairs as well.

  • John Gaspari

    Member
    February 15, 2021 at 3:08 pm

    I will try to use all four tools this week with my teaching. Since BrainingCamp does not have probability tools I’ll encourage students to use Mathigon for their spinners, coins and dice. While they work in their random groups they will have a paper bag with coloured tiles and a die to use for probability. When describing probability I will like to use the fraction circle (spinner) as one representation of probability and relate it to fraction strips (area/linear model) and the probability line (linear model). I hope that from collaborative student group work I will be able to use student generated solutions to consolidate my lessons.

  • Trina Gratrix

    Member
    February 16, 2021 at 10:58 am

    I’m on break this week, but what I’m going to use next week when I get back is Visual Models (online manipulatives). We are finishing up dividing fractions, and the pattern blocks, fraction strips, and number line tools look to be awesome for exploring this concept that always feels challenging.

  • Kyle Pearce

    Administrator
    February 18, 2021 at 7:31 am

    Loving that although many of you have already been using these tools in your practice, you’ve each decided on a way to build on what you’ve been doing.

    Many of the tasks in our units area have many representations and guides that encourage modelling and multiple representations. Be sure to check them out here:

    learn.makemathmoments.com/tasks

  • Scott McNutt

    Member
    February 19, 2021 at 10:09 am

    The tool I will use is student-generated solutions. When using the CPM curriculum, there is a lot of collaboration and group discussion to solve problems. We are approaching questions about rebound ratios and how to predict how high a ball will bounce and various heights. We will not throw a tennis ball off the top of our building (Which is 610 cm), but we love to see the investigation for students to make predictions.

    I would approach the student-generated solutions from a level of complexity. We can have the students who try to bounce the ball to give a visual, to the ones who try to calculate a ratio of drop height to rebound height, to the students who provide a graphical representation for their ball drop rebound any size. The student-generated answers should all be valued and built on the previous.

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      February 20, 2021 at 6:55 am

      Fantastic! Great curriculum and great ways to apply student generated solutions!

  • Maryanna Biedermann

    Member
    February 19, 2021 at 5:32 pm

    I am going to focus on increasing discourse over all and reinforcing with concrete materials. Utilizing student generated solutions, which may be shared with a partner, a group, and/or the class, will be something I seek out. In order for this to have impact, I have to ensure that I make time to brainstorm what students might do and improving my ability to live with the discomfort of not knowing exactly how strategies and methods may go.

    Integration of visuals into all topics means that students need to have access of visual tools for their reasoning too. I have many ideas that I feel would be a powerful way of sharing particular math concepts but don’t yet have the technology knowledge. For now, I will use concrete manipulatives and animations that convey content. I am hoping that perhaps Scratch will help me here….

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      February 20, 2021 at 6:57 am

      Great ideas and I will encourage you to note that you don’t have to be creating the visuals yourself. Often times there are great images and animations out there like on https://mathisvisual.com

      Also, we do all of our visuals and animations in Apple keynote which is just a slide show software. Just a heads up 🙂

  • DAVID DIEHL

    Member
    February 24, 2021 at 10:31 pm

    I think the concrete manipultives is the next move for me. I tried the shotput unit on your website to get my equations unit in 7th grade and systems of equations unit in 8the grade kicked off this week. We are all remote so manipulatives are an issue. I briefly considered having the students cut out algebra tiles at home or sometyihng of the like to show the measring sticks. I saw very quickly the need to help students understand the role each number played in the problem. I tried using Geogebra’s algebra tiles and I am thinking of using them more over the rest of the unit.

    The other piece I have been using in my warm-ups is student solutions. I have really liked allowing students to view the problems in their own way. It has lead to uses of estimation, skip counting and even starting to develop the px + r = q format. Our new theme is talking about adding your piece to the puzzle. Any question, any noticing, any thought, right or wrong, could lead us to the next important idea.

    https://student.desmos.com/join/g6d8xd

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      February 26, 2021 at 6:27 am

      Love it. One step at a time!

      Virtual manipulatives might also play a role here.

      How is the unit going?

  • Laura Las Heras Ruiz

    Member
    March 12, 2021 at 8:15 am

    Here, next weak we will be in the exams weak because it’s the end of the quarter of the course. So in the next quarter I will teach about functions and geometry in my 12 years old students and functions and trigonometry with my 15 years old students. I will use these 4 greats tool’s. Geometry and functions are easy topics to start applying what I’m learning in this course not just this 4 tools of this unit. So I will jump in to the pool and I will reprogram all my next lessons. Will see how it works!!

  • Michelle Grebe

    Member
    March 13, 2021 at 2:51 pm

    I’m not in the classroom yet, but I will start with concrete manipulatives and visuals + context. I really see from this module the value of context before going contextless. Having a solid understanding of the context and the ability to visualize or re-create the reasoning will be a frame for other related math problems.

  • Erin Koehler Smith

    Member
    March 13, 2021 at 7:48 pm

    Student generated solutions has been powerful in my room. I try to take it a step further and have students “get in the brain” of a student’s solutions – we analyze/unpack how and why the work was represented the way it was. Showing a variety of approaches builds confidence and normalizes the use of strategies that some students are reluctant to try (especially using visuals or manipulatives).

  • Stephen Prince

    Member
    March 22, 2021 at 9:20 pm

    In my classroom, I have large (8ft) whiteboards on all the walls. The bottom 4 feet is very useful so students can display their thinking around the outside of the room. This allows me to give instant feedback and so students can communicate their thinking to one another. I will often pick out student examples so students can explain their ideas to smaller groups and the whole class.

  • Jeremiah Barrett

    Member
    May 27, 2021 at 10:31 am

    The tool that I already regularly use is the Student Generated Solutions tool. This is one of the ways that I am able to build a student centered classroom. It also is a great way to use and practice discourse in the math language. Next week I am going to try to incorporate some visuals into my lessons using the some of the programs that I have come across in previous posts. I am in the middle of a unit on volume so I think visuals will be the perfect addition to my lessons.

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      June 8, 2021 at 7:16 am

      Fantastic! We just released another unit on volume in the tasks area… give it a gander!

  • NICHOLAS SMITH

    Member
    June 7, 2021 at 9:06 pm

    I go around and take pictures of student generated strategies with my iPad and then cast the photos straight to the projector when it comes time to class discussion.

    • Jon Orr

      Administrator
      June 8, 2021 at 7:15 am

      I’ve used this strategy as well. More often now I just ask the class to join me at that specific board while we discuss the strategy .

      • NICHOLAS SMITH

        Member
        June 8, 2021 at 1:42 pm

        Any particular reason you made the switch? My room is not conducive to have the whiteboards hanging up along the walls like you do, so they just keep the whiteboard at their table. I’m looking more into whiteboarding pedagogy at the moment; I’ve noticed some people have the entire class meet in a circle with whiteboards displayed in front of each group as they go around and discuss. . . any thoughts or pointers?

      • Jon Orr

        Administrator
        June 9, 2021 at 6:27 am

        If you haven’t listened to Peter L on the podcast give it a listen. https://makemathmoments.com/episode21 and https://makemathmoments.com/episode98

      • NICHOLAS SMITH

        Member
        June 14, 2021 at 2:15 pm

        I listened to the podcasts and have ordered “Building Thinking Classrooms”! I’m stoked!! The research sounds epic!!!

        Thank you so much the recommendation.

  • Jennifer Kelley

    Member
    June 9, 2021 at 3:51 pm

    Fantastic examples! Making sense of the formula in this way is phenomenal! We’re on summer break, but this absolutely will go into my toolbox for next year.

    By big take-away: the more opportunities given to students for exploration and input yields greater outcomes for learning.

    I’m looking at our new textbooks and I rewrote lesson one to begin with a curious task, and I will also include manipulatives (personal number lines) and incorporate multiple representations. I’m actually going to tape out a number line on the floor, have the kids place themselves on it according to the numbers identified in the problem and physically see what’s happening. I’m excited!

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      June 10, 2021 at 6:56 am

      So glad this learning has left you energized for next school year! 🙂

  • Kathleen Bourne

    Member
    June 10, 2021 at 9:12 pm

    I have a huge range of abilities in my Gr. 8 classroom. Allowing multiple representations means every voice is valued. All answers “work” somehow and fuel understanding.

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      June 11, 2021 at 7:19 am

      Fantastic to hear! The tough part is on us to be able to notice and name the strategies and help connect them so students see them as related.

  • Gerilyn Stolberg

    Member
    June 12, 2021 at 5:56 pm

    I have been using all of these tools in the past. IN the past I always used Student generated solutions after I taught the concepts. Now I am beginning to use student generated solutions every day. I use PearDeck which allows me to see students work live- as I am still teaching virtually. I am able to project student work and have students and I explain the math that they used to solve the problem. It has been giving students much more ownership in their learning. Students want me to share their math thinking with the class. I try to share student work that is concise and correct but also student work that is not solved in the most concise way or with errors, which allows us to work through the math and discuss why the error or misconception happened. As I move back into classroom teaching in the fall, I have purchased additional whiteboards for students to show work and then we can place the whiteboard under the document camera to share with the rest of the class. I will continue to use manipulatives and visuals but will definitely be using the multiple representations and student generated solutions much more.

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      June 13, 2021 at 8:18 am

      Wow sounds like you’ve made some awesome shifts in how you’ve leveraged student generated solutions! Avoiding pre-teaching first is so key! Love this.

  • Karynn Faivre

    Member
    June 14, 2021 at 8:40 pm

    I loved the pentomino lesson. Like many,, I have build equations from word problems, but never thought to connect to 100’s board. In our school, teachers definitely solve equations by rote memorization. I am excited to see how students respond. I think this visual will help them make a connection between the need for an expression and the relationship of the numbers to each other.

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      June 15, 2021 at 7:01 am

      Glad you enjoyed it!! Always something new to explore and try!

  • azuka ojini

    Member
    June 16, 2021 at 11:50 am

    I suppose the transition from the use of physical manipulation of a concept where the learner is provided opportunity for interaction will prepare the mind to see multiple representations of the concept, and with visual tools, student generated solutions are all but assured. The first three tools, in a sense, are inextricably useful, I think, for the success of the fourth tool.

    • Jon Orr

      Administrator
      June 17, 2021 at 6:08 am

      Great realization here.

  • Marjorie Allred

    Member
    June 18, 2021 at 1:37 pm

    All of these tools are helpful. I especially like multiple representations and visuals. I am always telling my students to see if they can find a different way to look at a problem. When I was in high school many years ago, my math teacher told me to “draw the picture” and that made such a difference for me in solving problems. I need to make sure I get my students to do the same.

    I am afraid I am not teaching again until August, but when I get back to school, I am looking forward to using the hero’s journey curve to teach concepts instead of the old method of lecture and drill.

    • Jon Orr

      Administrator
      June 21, 2021 at 6:52 am

      You’ve got some time to think how implement that curve! Enjoy the break before we get back at it.

  • Diane Fortune

    Member
    June 21, 2021 at 12:32 pm

    Good morning! I’m looking forward to using concrete manipulatives with a better focus when we get back to school.

  • Anthony Waslaske

    Member
    June 28, 2021 at 12:17 am

    Wish I had a class to experiment on–well–not really, I like Summer vacation. last year incorporated numerous visuals into instruction and put them in the hand of students. When I discussed the discriminant in Algebra, I embedded this manipulative so students could see how it affected the number of solutions.

    https://www.desmos.com/calculator/rvrjnvtvwm

    It consolidated much of the work we did together during the pandemic. My focus for the upcoming school year is to use more student-generated solutions.

    Next year, I have a week-long unit ordering rational numbers. Students are tested on ordering square roots, fractions, decimals, and percents from either least to greatest or greatest to least. I’m thinking about a clothesline activity where groups reorder different number representations from ascending or descending order, but it only teaches students there can be only one correct answer. I wonder if you all had some advice or ideas.

  • Anthony Waslaske

    Member
    June 28, 2021 at 12:40 am

    How are you pooling student work together during consolidation. Desmos has a new lab where students can upload pictures, I was thinking about running snapshots through it. However, that is a recent development, so how are you pooling student work together for an impromptu discussion coherently. Also, where does the notetaking follow in this lesson cycle? Consolidation seems like the place to do something like that.

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      June 28, 2021 at 7:17 am

      We’ve used Snapshots in Desmos when using Desmos activities. For other work – say just working at the whiteboards, etc – we tend to take photos on our phones or have students upload photos via Knowledgehook’s Snapshots tool. You can see more about this in the “from a distance” course.
      As for notes, consolidation is a great spot for students to jot down “notes to my future forgetful self” (as Peter Liljedahl calls them). This way students are reflecting and have something to take with them / refer to afterwards.

  • Karen Kiefer

    Member
    June 29, 2021 at 3:13 pm

    Unfortunately I will have to wait until September to hopefully be in class with my students to try this out. I do see the benefit of students seeing other student’s solutions as sometimes they listen to their peers better than they listen to the teacher. I also think that students will focus better when you’re talking about one of their peers solutions rather than “some boring method the teacher wants me to know”. I think this keeps them engaged in the problem after the manipulation and solving on their own stage.

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      June 30, 2021 at 6:43 am

      So true! When you are pulling the learning from student generated solutions, there is a sense of ownership and pride there. “We” did this!

  • Penny Johansson

    Member
    June 30, 2021 at 1:25 pm

    Student generated solutions I find to be most useful to make math more accessible because each of the four tools can be seen as students show their ways of thinking to tackle a problem.

    I would like to try using the visuals more through introducing multiplication and division.

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      July 1, 2021 at 7:56 am

      Love it! See our problem based units section to dive into this!
      learn.makemathmoments.com/tasks

  • Lori Plate

    Member
    June 30, 2021 at 11:21 pm

    Since I am on summer break, I am not able to try any of the tools in my classes. I think the one I want to focus on the most for my own growth is using student generated solutions during the productive struggle and consolidation phases of the lesson. The other three tools I have used sporadically in my lessons, but I tended to not give as much voice to the students thinking to tie their learning to something more concrete and contextual.

    To me, it seems like a key for all of the tools is to have the students using words to express what is happening before writing it out and using numbers from the problem itself. Once they have been able to do this, they are more likely to be able to come up with the general connections algebraically, which is basically working my lessons in reverse order.

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      July 1, 2021 at 7:58 am

      Love this and yes, starting with student generated solutions allows us to meet them where they are and to make connections across representations during the consolidation. It is at this time that we can really hone in on the intended learning for that lesson while students can see their thinking in the consolidation as new ideas emerge.

  • Andrea Cadman

    Member
    July 1, 2021 at 4:19 pm

    I, too, am out for the summer, but come August I will set the goal of using student work to consolidate. In the past, I have used the other three tools and will continue with them, but I have cut the consolidation piece short, both in time and process.

    If I start at the beginning with choosing tasks that support the learning I am looking for, follow the hero’s journey, take the time to work through each task as a student as well as a teacher, and generally be better prepared, I think that being able to sequence student work and present it during consolidation will be much more natural than how I was trying to do it previously.

  • Peter Gehbauer

    Member
    July 4, 2021 at 12:22 pm

    The student solution illustrates the method of elimination (subtracting two equations) in a very practical and much less abstract way. Nice…

  • Carrie Winland

    Member
    July 4, 2021 at 4:22 pm

    I’m most excited about using the multiply representations in class. It will force me to prepare better than I currently am and look at how there are multiple ways to solve a problem. I tell the students that I don’t care how they solve a problem as long as they get the right answer, however I only provide one way of solving. I’d like the challenge myself and the students to look at other ways to solve problems.

  • Betsy Lesley

    Member
    July 5, 2021 at 3:27 pm

    I already use multiple representations and student generated solutions, and on a very limited basis, concrete manipulatives. I am eager to increase my use of manipulatives and visuals…and I have a video brewing in my head to introduce my favorite manipulatives…macaroni used to add integers. Need to noodle it… (pun intended!)

  • Mary Herbst

    Member
    July 8, 2021 at 5:22 pm

    I want to do some more looking through mathisvisual and also the online manipulatives from braining camp.

  • Terri Bond

    Member
    July 8, 2021 at 9:32 pm

    I’m actually out on summer break right now, so I won’t be able to try one next week, but I will definitely integrate all four tools when school begins again in August. I have always been an elementary math teacher, but will be a school-wide interventionist next year.

    Honestly I made what I think is an important connection among all four of the Go-To tools. When students generate their own solutions, some of them will use concrete manipulatives, some will create their own visuals, and some will be able to make multiple representations of their thinking. We can also gather everyone’s responses so that we have even more varied representations. Likewise, as the teacher, I will provide concrete manipulatives and / or visuals to help kids generate their own solutions.

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      July 9, 2021 at 7:19 am

      This is a great take away – couldn’t agree more. All of the tools are so important and one might be more important to one student for one problem and another might emerge as more important on another problem or for another student. Nice work!

  • Lisamarie Barnes

    Member
    July 9, 2021 at 4:55 pm

    Since it’s Summer break, I will not be able to implement a lesson using these strategies until we return in August. I do like how students are expected to apply prior knowledge to solve math problems rather than daily spoon feeding them textbook strategies. I agree with Terri that all four tools maybe used as needed by any given student…built in differentiation! As a student and new teacher (on the planning side), I found myself using these tools whenever an instructor or textbook explanations didn’t coincidence with my thought process. Logically it makes sense that our students encounter the same frustration and need to be able to prove or disprove their thought process if they are going to gain confidence in math.

  • Linda Andres

    Member
    July 13, 2021 at 9:34 pm

    Since I am using this class to prepare for next year, I am applying my learning to my initial lessons on repeating and growing patterns. This is where I am at so far in my rough copy of a plan. As I am learning, I am growing my understanding in my own “productive struggle” phase.

    I think I would be reviewing repeating patterns first, to give the kids chances to build and describe their own patterns. This will give me a benchmark for where student understanding is and show me where I might need to build in the productive struggle into that learning before I proceed with this lesson. It will also give me a start at the use of visuals and different representations as a part of learning.

    My goal is for students to be able to describe a growing pattern by finding the “rule” that determined the next terms in the pattern. I am wondering whether it would be better for me to use a video and stop it or use my document camera to introduce the terms of the pattern for the sparking curiosity phase. I do think that after the second phase I would like to have the kids build what they think the next term would look like and explain why they made the choices they did.

    An applied mathematician, Linda Wahl, demonstrates a way to help students view their patterns in a different way. Wahl introduces a visual representation of the growth of the pattern using bingo dabbers and large chart paper in a pictograph form which is clear and yield many possibilities to build forward. I am still not sure where to show this visualization so that I don’t impose a strategy but invite student engagement first. I wonder whether I should demonstrate her method before or after I have invited students to “show me” how their pattern grows.

    I am going to go on with the course so I can keep putting together the pieces.

    • Jon Orr

      Administrator
      July 14, 2021 at 7:15 am

      I’m loving the idea of asking students to predict the next term in the pattern….then ask them to describe or draw the 23rd picture!

      Bingo dabbers is a great idea!

  • Tracy Arriola

    Member
    July 15, 2021 at 10:47 am

    When we start the school year, I am going to work on providing manipulatives for as many lessons as I can. I think starting out with the manipulatives is going to be key to reach every learner. Then moving to visual representation and equations after that. I often jump to the equation too fast or from the start.

  • Jill Miles

    Member
    July 15, 2021 at 9:22 pm

    Based on where I saw gaps from last year’s group, I really want to have a LOT of concrete manipulatives for students to use as needed as well as multiple representations.

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      July 16, 2021 at 8:38 am

      Awesome to hear. Also remember that in order for students to make use of them, we must also encourage and emerge mathematical models otherwise they might not know how to attempt using them as a tool for thinking.

  • Jenn Stuart

    Member
    July 17, 2021 at 8:48 am

    Reflecting on the use of the four tools is helpful. I have used many of the tools to help but not always with intention and purpose. Typically, when I have used manipulatives it has only been a here are the manipulatives that make sense to me to use them and go ahead. I like that there was a purpose and it was here are the tools, show me how it looks. I really like using the visuals, and students’ work. Not only does it lighten my load but the student’s voice is present, so is ownership. Thanks. I am looking forward to making my changes to incorporate the tools.

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      July 17, 2021 at 8:56 am

      Great take away and reflection. It is definitely a process and being intentional about how we leverage these tools is so important. Let us know how this progresses for you!

  • Velia Kearns

    Member
    July 19, 2021 at 4:34 pm

    Grit tools (Concrete Manipulatives, Multiple Rep, Visuals, Student Generated Solutions) – which tool do you find the most useful to make the math more accessible for your students?
    A: The one closest to my comfort zone is visuals. I always look to YouTube to see a breadth of examples, perspectives, and ideas. I do think that visuals help me, and do believe that visuals will help students as well.

    Which will you try next week and how will you go about using it?
    A: I’m guilty of many times searching for methodical solutions that students can refer to as examples for process which are rote methods of steps in writing the solution on paper. I think what I want to do more is either brainstorm my own visuals, or when I search through YouTube, I’ll search more to spread the different perspectives, examples and ideas, rather than the rote learning of the process.

    A: As for Student Generated Solutions – I have to, myself, learn to accept more student generated solutions, rather than a “can you do the solution my way” I do accept whatever they give me and mark it for correctness – when it comes to “Application” style questions, but many times during learning and Homework Questions, I’m trying to adjust their way of writing it down – Notation, organization, presentation. I may have to step out of my comfort zone for this – do you have any comments about this in your teaching career?

    Thank you!

  • Denny Nelson

    Member
    July 21, 2021 at 1:32 pm

    Student generated solutions was interesting. For years, I’ve given too much up front in an attempt to be helpful. Instead, my job is to create situations and environments where students will wrestle with the ideas and start to come up with solutions on their own.

    Obviously for this to work, I need to be quite familiar with what is actually happening. I also need to know when and how to intervene if a student understanding “isn’t quite there yet.” It is easier to just give answers but I want to help them on the journey to understanding.

  • Mary Jackson

    Member
    July 21, 2021 at 3:22 pm

    Reflecting back on how previous students in my classes have struggled to accessing math concepts and remembering concepts I have taught…. I plan to use more manipulatives as well as visuals for my lessons during this next school year. Also, not pre-teaching and giving students more time to uncover concepts on their own before formalizing notes. I also plan to use more student solutions for Consolidating the learning that is going on in our classroom.

  • Holly Dybvig

    Member
    July 23, 2021 at 11:15 pm

    There are SO many topics in Texas sixth grade math that I think all 4 of these tools will come in handy at various times throughout the year. In 3-2 I used concrete manipulatives to engage students in discovering the relationships of lengths in triangles. This year I will also be teaching a section of advanced math, so I will really get into new formulas that were not discussed in previous school years. This will be a wonderful time to utilize student generated strategies. I feel that the visuals will be extremely helpful in allowing the students to see the real-world use of these standards. I have used these tools in the past, but clearly not to the best of their abilities, and typically AFTER I had already taught the lesson rather than before. What I’m taking away from this the most is how to reorder my lessons to really pull the students in rather than trying to catch their attention after I have already lost them in the lecture.

  • Joanne Duval

    Member
    July 30, 2021 at 2:40 pm

    Which tool(s) from this module (concrete manipulatives, multiple representations, visuals, and student generated solutions) do you found to be most useful to make the math more accessible for your students?

    We are not in session right now. I use manipulatives and visuals during all my math lessons but more in a “let me show you how the tool works to do the job mode”. I need to rethink how to switch it to a “you pick a tool that will help you show me your thinking”.

    Which will you try next week and how will you go about using it?

    I need to have students recognized for their solutions and use multiple representations more often.

  • Serina Signorello

    Member
    August 9, 2021 at 11:56 pm

    I am so excited to use these tools this year! Right now I am most excited about using multiple representations and student generated strategies. Last year I was trying to figure out a way to have students explore and discover solving systems of equations using elimination method and it was while discussing a question on a quiz that I realized how AWESOME this question was to show students how to use elimination method before learning it.

    The question from my McGrawHill Algebra I textbook reads as follows:

    The cost of two groups who recently visited an aquarium is shown in the table.

    How much will a group of 3 adults and 5 children be charged for admission?

    When I spent some time speaking with the student about what she knew she was able to figure it out using simple calculations, I look forward to changing the problem slightly and adding visuals and making it real with pics of my family at Crayola Factory or an amusement park and incorporating a notice and wonder. I am very excited to see the student responses, discuss the unknown values, and I can already visualize my consolidation and extension activities

  • Vanessa Weske

    Member
    August 11, 2021 at 7:17 pm

    While they’re all super useful, since I am in the start of the new school year I think manipulatives are very important for younger grades and many of the lower grade teachers I coach will be using explorations times for students to get familiar with math tools and manipulatives. Also of importance right now is multiple representations so students coming in this week will see themselves and one another as “math people”, we are all mathematicians and will all bring a unique spin and problem solving approach. I have asked the teachers to use low floor/high ceiling tasks this week to problem solve together before generating math class “rules” and integrating growth mindset activities.

  • Valentina Mejia

    Member
    August 17, 2021 at 7:52 pm

    I love using all these tools but I find I use multiple representations the best as I always ask my students to show me that they have verified their work with another method. I want to work on showing and working through student generated solutions better but I sometimes find it difficult as there are students who are too scared to even start a problem when I give them open ended questions.

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      August 20, 2021 at 7:08 am

      Multiple representations is so key to helping different students make connections from the work of others to their own. Awesome!

  • Susan Imker

    Member
    August 19, 2021 at 6:40 pm

    I plan to use concrete manipulatives, visual representations, and student-generated solutions in my lessons once we start back to school. I am very excited to use the stacking paper sequel to teach slope; I can see where this will really help students to make sense of this often more abstract concept. I really appreciated the “this is how I used to teach this” part. Now I totally understand why my students didn’t understand so much of the math I tried to teach them in the past–there was absolutely no context whatsoever, it was just memorizing formulas. Major aha moment!!

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      August 20, 2021 at 7:09 am

      Huge! And the other stacking paper tasks are fantastic as well… really enjoyed making and using those tasks!

  • Peggy Allen

    Member
    August 21, 2021 at 6:49 pm

    Summer is wrapping up, and I’ll be back in school with students in three weeks. I will use all four tools but will likely place more emphasis on concrete manipulatives to build a strong foundation (particularly for grade 6), visuals, and student generated solutions. For student generated solutions, I want every student to realize that they are capable of finding a way to solve a problem and even though it may not seem as high level as another student’s, it is just as valuable. It is important to share the varied ways of thinking and representing. We will all work together to get to where we need to be.

    • Kyle Pearce

      Administrator
      August 24, 2021 at 6:42 am

      Love how you’re eager to put all of these ideas into play! Are there any covid restrictions you’ll need to work through re: concrete manipulatives?

Viewing 1 - 48 of 48 replies

Original Post
0 of 0 posts June 2018
Now