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Make Math Moments Academy Forums Community Discussion Podcast Discussion EPISODE 26: How To Overcome A Common Math Myth From K Through College

  • EPISODE 26: How To Overcome A Common Math Myth From K Through College

    Posted by Jon on May 27, 2019 at 2:09 pm

    Episode

    In this episode you’ll get to spend some time with Jon and Kyle as we share the story of a recent school walk-through that we participated in recently while attending a conference. The story leads into a common math teaching myth about how we prepare our students for the next grade level.

    Jon replied 3 years, 6 months ago 2 Members · 2 Replies
  • 2 Replies
  • George Garza

    Member
    May 31, 2019 at 2:52 am

    I enjoyed listening to the episode, I liked hearing about the variety of classrooms you had been two and what they were doing.

    So the biggest question I have about the episode is the point that was made about being realistic.   I totally appreciate the value of tracking students in little mini goals that are updated on a weekly bases, and I can see it being a valuable practice, it just really seems like it would take a large chunk of time that that I don’t really have.  As a high school teacher, I’ve got 180ish students, if I spent 3 minutes a piece creating and updating minigoals for them, that’s 9 hours.  How have others done this, or an equivalent of it?

    Seems like best practice would be to have students do that themselves, have them set and track their own math goals each week.  What do you all think?

     

    • Jon

      Administrator
      May 31, 2019 at 7:53 am

      Hey George, @georgegarza

      We totally understand the realness of actually setting goals for each student. I also teach over a hundred high school students a year. When I set goals for students I’m not necessarily writing these goals down or setting aside time to do it.

      The biggest shift in my teaching has been letting students productively struggle on problems so I can observe their thinking. While observing, I quickly create make a mental note on where that student currently is in their learning progression and where they need to get to (goal). Considering the class goals as a collective also helps me decide on what standards need to be strengthened and which need more attention. I find this technique helps me understand my students’ thinking at a deeper level and saves me time.

      I’ve also found that taking pictures of student thinking and uploading them to their portfolio in Freshgrade has been super easy and useful for remembering where a student is on their progression.

      What are others doing to reflect on ongoing student learning?