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  • Class time distribution

    Posted by Joanne Ward on September 9, 2019 at 11:36 am

    Hi All,

    I wonder how everyone split up your time into didactic teaching and problem-based tasks such as the 3-Acts pedagogy that @Kyle and @Jon shared with us:) Any recommendations? 

    Joanne Ward replied 3 years ago 2 Members · 7 Replies
  • 7 Replies
  • Kyle Pearce

    Administrator
    September 10, 2019 at 4:46 pm

    For me, I try to keep some form of task at the centre of each lesson and do the more didactic teaching method(s) at the end during consolidation. 

    How about others? 

    • Joanne Ward

      Member
      September 23, 2019 at 10:12 pm

      Hi @kyle, Thank you for your response! After I ponder this for a few days, I guess I understand more what you mean now. Thank you very much for your response!

      • Kyle Pearce

        Administrator
        November 2, 2019 at 4:04 pm

        Hi Joanne! How are you progressing on this front? Any updates? New realizations/epiphanies and/or wonders that still remain?

      • Joanne Ward

        Member
        November 3, 2019 at 7:05 am

        Hi @Kyle, How are you? Thank you for catching up! I think I do. The different lesson requires different types of delivery. For things that are more complicated for students to understand, sometimes direct instruction is the most efficient way!?

      • Joanne Ward

        Member
        November 3, 2019 at 7:06 am

        Hi @Kyle and @Jon, I also have a quick question: why do your students always write on the table? 🙂 It seems fun. I wonder why:)

      • Kyle Pearce

        Administrator
        November 3, 2019 at 2:33 pm

        Hi Joanne! 

        I wonder whether it is different topics that require different types of delivery or whether we need to pause and think to ourselves “what makes this concept so complex?”

        If we better understand why something is complex, can we craft an experience that will help students engage with that concept?

        Does that make sense?
        As for writing on the desks, it comes down to Peter Liljedahl’s work with vertical non-permanent surfaces… the desk is horizontal, but that non-permanent”ness” of it gives kids the permission to take chances/risks and not worry about it being “etched in stone” like we often feel like when we write something down on paper. Even writing in pencil is more permanent (can see the erasemarks) and there is something psychological that seems to hold some students back from just giving it a shot…

      • Joanne Ward

        Member
        November 3, 2019 at 8:28 pm

        Hi @kyle, Thank you for the response! I think I understand what you’re saying. I really like the idea of writing on the table. It is very cool :))